Animaan Pathak of Analog Party: “Don’t sell yourself short”

Don’t sell yourself short: There were many moments early on with the band where I was hesitant to speak up in certain situations. For example, discussing getting paid at shows was something I often overlooked at the time because I felt we weren’t at a certain “level” that demanded that discussion be had yet. It’s […]

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Don’t sell yourself short: There were many moments early on with the band where I was hesitant to speak up in certain situations. For example, discussing getting paid at shows was something I often overlooked at the time because I felt we weren’t at a certain “level” that demanded that discussion be had yet. It’s important to have faith in yourself and what you’re contributing to the world. If you don’t believe in yourself, no one else will!


As a part of our series about rising music stars, I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing Animaan Pathak.

With brooding introspective lyrics, Analog Party’s blend of grunge, classic rock, punk, and industrial music captures the existential feelings that many young people share in an increasingly chaotic world. Formed in 2018 by two longtime friends, Analog Party has released a debut EP and three singles to date, while performing shows around Los Angeles over the past two years and continuing to grow their budding fanbase. On their latest bluesy single “Blind Driver,” Analog Party reflect on apathy and escapism while delivering fierce hard rock riffs, underneath powerful and impassioned vocals.


Thank you so much for joining us in this interview series! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

I grew up moving around quite a bit before my family settled in Los Angeles when I was eight years old. Charles — the other half of Analog Party — is an LA native through and through. I always loved music from an early age, and once I got to LA I picked up drumming, which immediately became my biggest passion. I started playing in different local bands when I got to my teens, and I met Charles through a mutual friend when the first band I was in needed a bassist. Along the way, I taught myself how to play guitar and write songs, and eventually moved into singing because we could never find the right voice for our musical vision. We’ve been playing together for almost a decade through our teens and early twenties, but Analog Party as a band has been around for the past three years.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

I started listening to music and watching music videos very early on. In the early 2000s, there were still a lot of rock videos being played on MTV, so bands who had big success at the time like Linkin Park and the Red Hot Chili Peppers became childhood favorites. When I was five years old, a family friend gifted my brother and I Use Your Illusion II by Guns N’ Roses, and I became obsessed with the raw, organic sound of rock music. I tossed my toys aside and avidly started collecting CDs and rock magazines. I started drumming shortly thereafter, and the rest is history!

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

Growing up as a young musician in Los Angeles and just being around the entertainment industry has definitely brought about its fair share of interesting stories, but I wouldn’t be able to pinpoint anything specific. It’s always been a surprising thrill to run into one of your musical heroes at a bar or show. I’ll say that recording our debut EP Model Youth in England was an amazing experience. We went down to the south coast and lived in the studio’s artist loft for two weeks, and the environment definitely seeped into the music. Christoph Skirl, the engineer on all of our material so far, became a dear friend after those sessions, and is like the third member of Analog Party when it comes to the recording process.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

Having been in bands from such a young age, there’s a healthy level of idealism and naïveté that naturally goes along with that. We’ve definitely paid our dues early on: performing those painfully awkward shows where we were promised a lot of “exposure” and ended up essentially playing to an empty room. I suppose you just learn who and what opportunities to trust along the way — as well as how to properly book and promote a show!

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

We just released our newest single entitled Blind Driver on June 25th, and have an upcoming show on June 30th at Resident in downtown LA. Outside of that, we’ve been working on a large group of songs that we’re extremely excited about recording in the near future. There’s a lot more music and shows to come!

We are very interested in diversity in the entertainment industry. Can you share three reasons with our readers about why you think it’s important to have diversity represented in film and television? How can that potentially affect our culture?

In general, I think the more diversity there is in entertainment and art, the more there is to creatively draw from for artists. For the audience, their minds and tastes are expanded by the proliferation of new perspectives and stories. We live in a world of increasing cultural cross-pollination and there’s no going back from that. The future will only lead to new waves of fresh and interesting artistic works, so long as we as a society embrace diversity.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

  1. Trust your instincts: It’s really important to move forward with your gut feeling in this business. Maybe you make a mistake that way, but you can always learn from that and move on. Either way, you’ll always have your integrity intact, and that’s invaluable.
  2. Don’t sell yourself short: There were many moments early on with the band where I was hesitant to speak up in certain situations. For example, discussing getting paid at shows was something I often overlooked at the time because I felt we weren’t at a certain “level” that demanded that discussion be had yet. It’s important to have faith in yourself and what you’re contributing to the world. If you don’t believe in yourself, no one else will!
  3. One thing at a time: Personally, I still struggle with staying calm in the midst of certain busy periods with the band. At times, things can feel really overwhelming, especially because in today’s world as an independent artist, you have to wear many different hats — it’s not as simple as just writing, recording, and playing. What’s important is to take a breath, and tackle everything one step at a time.
  4. Always listen, but don’t blindly follow: The nature of the music industry is that as soon as you release music — something extremely personal and vulnerable — you open yourself up to opinions from all places. You shouldn’t have a bad attitude and ignore anything that’s not positive feedback. Rather, always listen to what other people have to offer up and try to find the constructive feedback within it — then, do with it what you will.
  5. Enjoy the process: Every now and then it’s easy to get obsessed with meeting certain goals. Goals are great, but remember to enjoy the journey! Every single day isn’t going to be a big milestone, and sometimes you have to deal with doing more monotonous tasks in order to promote your music, but all of it plays a role in the big picture of being an artist. Learn to trust in the process and not stress out over the little things.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

I would recommend finding healthy outlets that allow you to tune out when you need to. No matter how great something is, everyone needs time to recharge at one point or another. For me, I’ve found that fitness, travel, cooking, films, books, and (very) amateur photography all help a lot.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

Well I think the two obvious answers to help the most amount of people would be to end world hunger and make serious efforts regarding climate change. I do also think inspiring a mass movement where people moved off social media and started really engaging with one another, face to face, would be healthier for all of us.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

Overall, I would just have to say thank you to our family and friends for supporting us along the way, anyone we’ve worked with so far in a significant capacity, and all artists who have inspired and continue to inspire us.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

I don’t know about a life lesson, but my personal mantra is that complacency kills ___. You can fill in the blank yourself. For me, complacency kills ambition, self-confidence, etc. Being complacent in anything that one’s involved with does anything but breed positive self-growth.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

I would love to sit down at some point with Trent Reznor and discuss his life story so far. His brilliant body of work speaks for itself, but it’s his journey from a raucous industrial musician to Oscar-winning composer and family man that really highlights how to absolutely smash it in terms of career longevity.

How can our readers follow you online?

People can follow the band on Instagram (@analogparty), subscribe to our YouTube channel, follow us on Bandcamp, and of course stream our music on all streaming platforms!

This was very meaningful, thank you so much! We wish you continued success!

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