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Your health at home

Sometimes in life, we are forced to face situations for which we had not prepared ourselves. Emotional well-being As a consequence of the current pandemic, we have had to modify our usual routines. This situation generates emotions and feelings for us, for which we will need tools. Self-care will help us feel better and be […]

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Sometimes in life, we are forced to face situations for which we had not prepared ourselves.

Emotional well-being

As a consequence of the current pandemic, we have had to modify our usual routines. This situation generates emotions and feelings for us, for which we will need tools.

Self-care will help us feel better and be able to take care of our environment. Maintaining mental hygiene, a positive attitude, and learning, will provide us with resources that will strengthen us.

General advice

These are some tips to take care of and protect our emotional health and well-being during this situation.

Create your own daily routine, with different types of activities and try to follow regular schedules

Creating a routine to get through the day and meeting regular hours are two aspects of great help to stay emotionally strong and have more controlled nerves.

Try to find a balance between different types of activities, including for example:

  • Self-care (personal hygiene, food, rest),
  • Responsibilities (teleworking, taking care of the house or others),
  • Physical exercise
  • Leisure

You can make a list of activities and plan a little for the next few days. It is advisable to find a balance between routine and that each day is a little different. Not spending too much time on activities that you think are of little use or “a waste of time” will help you feel better at the end of the day. You can take advantage of it to recover tasks that you have pending to do at home.

It is very important to stay physically active or active. Physical exercise has a positive effect on emotional well-being, helps reduce anxiety, and improves sleep quality. Try to do some physical exercise every day, depending on your level of mobility and personal situation. Walking around the house, dancing, doing exercise boards, climbing stairs, Windows and doors installation for natural light and air to keep your mind fresh and relax.

Remember to leave enough space for those leisure activities that you like the most or make you feel good. Keep in mind that there is a multitude of proposals in the usual media, the web, and social networks. Remember that humor is a very useful antidote to reduce anxiety.

If you live with other people, try to combine time in the company with some moments and spaces for intimacy. When spending more time together it is important to agree on some basic rules of coexistence (schedules, spaces, responsibilities, etc.) and thus be able to avoid some discussions.

Stays informed or informed but limits your exposure to the information and select the sources well

It is important to stay informed about the situation of the pandemic and the recommendations of the authorities, but excessive exposure to the information can generate anguish and discomfort. Also keep in mind that many rumors and false information can circulate, especially on social networks, and that these tend to generate more anxiety and insecurity. Remember also that boys and girls are especially sensitive to what they hear or see on TV or radio. Therefore it is recommended:

Limit the amount of time you spend reviewing information about the coronavirus, especially if it makes you feel bad. Try to choose specific times to access that information (for example, twice a day) and avoid continuing to inform yourself outside of those times.

Spend time searching for and listening to positive and recovery stories around the coronavirus.

Always choose reliable sources of information, such as the websites of public institutions or solvent media. Verify and contrast what you receive from unofficial sources.

Limit the use of social networks. Review the accounts, feeds, or groups that you follow or in which you participate (for example on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp, etc.) and consider silencing or unfollowing them if the information is not very reliable or if it seems too overwhelming.

Avoid spreading dubious information or from non-solvent sources. This way you will be helping to avoid the “contagion” of anxiety or panic in other people.

Stay connected or connected with others

Social support is a key help in coping with this situation since prolonged isolation is often a great enemy to emotional health.

Especially if you live alone, try to keep in regular contact with other people through the phone, messages, or video calls. Talking to the people you trust and being able to share your feelings and concerns with them is especially important.

It can also help you to stay “connected” with other regular, less-trusted contacts, through eg messages, WhatsApp groups, etc. Feeling that you are still part of your community and that you are not alone in this is very important.

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