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Why I Practice Excessive Gratitude

And why you should, too.

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I thank people. A lot.

Some would even say in excess. In desperate, deranged excess.

But it’s a great habit. One that I intend to keep.

Sending handwritten notes to everyone I meet. Emails describing how grateful I feel for them.

Messages updating them on how they have influenced and improved my life.

I do these extra things with everyone I meet.

Not because I like spending extra time on every interaction for the sake of it.

But because it brings 3 key benefits to life which are absolutely amazing.

1. It Makes People Feel Great

It makes people feel great. And they deserve it.

People have helped me. In more ways than I can even begin to count or describe.

And it’s easy to take that for granted. Easy because I’ve had the privilege of knowing so many great people who have generously improved my life in some way.

I think we all have those people in our lives. But sometimes they’re hidden in plain sight.

The Lyft driver who brightened my dark day by being friendly.

The friend who introduced me to another friend because he thought it might be helpful.

The author who wrote about a new idea which improved my outlook on life.

So I make an extra effort to thank them. Profusely.

Even for the small things. Especially for the small things.

Because that act makes me notice all that I have to be grateful for.

And that process in itself makes me happy.

And I get to improve the days of people who otherwise go unappreciated.

2. It Helps Me Be Memorable

People really love being recognized and appreciated.

It’s a core human need that everyone has. Feeling as though we matter to others.

That’s why people care about wanting to make an impact and about mission and culture.

It’s a symptom of the need to feel significant.

And they remember the people who make them feel that way.

In a world where people forget names within seconds, that’s super valuable.

So, sharing gratitude with people helps me be memorable and leads to opportunities because I come to mind as someone they know.

3. It Gets Me More Help (And Reasons To Be Grateful)

When you make people feel great, and they remember you, they’re even more eager to help you in the future.

Why? Because they’re used to their gestures being unappreciated.

And by making them feel great for helping you, you’re effectively rewarding positive behavior and creating a win-win situation.

I get notes back from people all the time thanking me for being so kind and welcoming me to ask for any feedback in the future. I even had one colleague (who is a customer of mine), send me a tearful video of him because he was so taken aback that I had sent him a handwritten note acknowledging how much he had helped me and a painting of his restaurant.

And I have built lasting, amazing relationships with people who have been kind to me.

Simply because I thanked them. Profusely. And was super appreciative of what they did for me.

People really love helping people. But they love being recognized for helping people even more.

That’s why anonymous donations are so rare and why so many charities are basically selling status to their top donors.

So thank people. And make them feel great. Because it will make them happy to help you in the future.

Conclusion

Gratitude is a habit worth adopting.

To make other people feel great.

To make yourself feel great.

And to be more memorable, earn more help, and notice all of the small blessings in life.

Because, once you train yourself to find things to thank someone for, you’ll sustainably feel happier and find beauty in life which was hidden in plain sight.

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