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What I discovered During COVID that I Neglected Before

Since the start of the COVID many of us have had a crash course in spirituality, resilience, mindfulness, and creating/maintaining human connections. We have been forced to re-examine our lives and received a crash course on living a simpler life. Our coping mechanisms have been strengthened, we have learned how to appreciate the time we […]

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Since the start of the COVID many of us have had a crash course in spirituality, resilience, mindfulness, and creating/maintaining human connections. We have been forced to re-examine our lives and received a crash course on living a simpler life. Our coping mechanisms have been strengthened, we have learned how to appreciate the time we spend in nature, savoring our mornings may have become more common, and we have turned quite neighborly by connecting with those around us.

As COVID has re-shaped my approach to life, I wanted to share some of the biggest lessons that I have picked up while in quarantine. I have already shared some of my mental well-being tips on my Instagram and ways to be productive in your work on my website (if you are a business owner like me). However, I wanted to dive a little deeper and expand on top  4 wisdoms I acquired during COVID:

  1. We need to spend more time in nature: Living in New York City, I have been deprived of green grass and tall trees. Even while visiting my parents in the country, I never took the time to appreciate the walks in a park or local hiking trails. During the COVID, I have been taking daily walks around my parents’ neighborhood to ensure my mental well-being, and it has completely changed my perspective on the importance of nature in our psychology. Maintaining my connection to nature is something that I look forward to nurturing in order to maintain peace, presence, and ensure gratitude.
Me in a local park next to my parents home
  • We may have everything we need already around us: when COVID cases and deaths peaked, I was so distracted about news in the world that it didn’t occur to me that I had just brought only basic essentials in my gym bag to stay with my parents. It was not until two months later that I realized I didn’t need most of the stuff I had accumulated in New York City.
  • We should establish a connection with our neighbors: Yesterday, I joked with my family that they have never had a more vibrant neighborhood than during COVID times. It seems that all of sudden their neighbors were fully enjoying their back porches, walks, sports, and conversations. We finally got to know some of the people who were living in close proximity, and it turned out they were beyond wonderful. It is interesting to realize that something difficult has to occur in order for us to develop stronger bonds with those around us.
  • Taking time to savor something is beyond gratifying: I always felt so guilty for reading a book on the weekend when this was the time to catch up with friends, family, and my boyfriend. It felt like every day was a 100-yard sprint, and I never seemed to have enough time for anything. I felt lazy if I was just enjoying a cup of tea and felt like this time could have been used more efficiently for a workout or cleaning. During COVID, I have learned that taking time to savor activities was not only gratifying but essential to our happiness. If we are constantly moving, we seldom notice the value of moments that make up our entire life.
While exploring the wild flower landscapes around my parents home town

COVID may end one day, but I hope to keep my newly acquired perspective on life forever. Mindfulness, presence, and gratitude should be priorities even when we feel our lives have become extra demanding. We may have everything and even more than we need, so why not take time to savor in life’s moments?

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