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Virtual Schooling and Helping Your Children Recover

After a year of online learning for millions of students, schools start to reopen their doors to welcome these students back. While some children found success in online schooling, others felt isolated and stressed out. Easing students back into the everyday world of physical school is a bittersweet challenge. One survey showed that out of 11,000 […]

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After a year of online learning for millions of students, schools start to reopen their doors to welcome these students back. While some children found success in online schooling, others felt isolated and stressed out. Easing students back into the everyday world of physical school is a bittersweet challenge.

One survey showed that out of 11,000 high school students, at least 30% felt the lockdown impaired their mental health. This is usually due to social isolation and the overall stress of online school. It does not mean there are all negatives to virtual school.

Many educators stress the positives for students. Some students say they love learning from home because it’s easier to concentrate. The social pressure isn’t as challenging for them. They can work their personal lives around their educational lives a lot easier as well. 

Many teachers see the positives as well. Teachers don’t spend all of their time outside of school grading papers. They’re working with the students better in videos and making education more personal. 

Some of these positive things can continue after the school doors open permanently. Teachers can use technology on a more frequent basis. Things like Zoom and Google Docs can become part of learning. 

There is a considerable problem with virtual schooling that over four million households still don’t have the best access to getting online. School districts cannot save everyone that falls through the gap. They all try to get their students connected, but it doesn’t work with every single student.

The efforts to bring in these students will continue during the summer with online tutoring and programs. Some students can get special attention when they return with one-on-one meetings. 

There will also be a boom in students that choose to continue virtual or homeschooling. The students that find online learning more beneficial may not return. Parents may want to keep some students home as well. Whether they don’t choose the vaccine or aren’t available to school-aged children, some parents don’t feel comfortable. 

The pandemic has changed the lives of millions of students. Some will continue to learn from home, while others benefit more from walking in the school doors. Either way, education is forever changed. Save

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