Community//

Seeking Grace

The Story That Changes Everything...

Spreading #kindness and #compassion to a world in desperate need of it...

Six years ago I was told about a young man many might look at, and on the surface think, “What a loser.” He wore spiked hair, dressed Goth, and he had ‘love’ and ‘hate’ tattooed on his knuckles. Only in the 11th grade, he looked like someone to avoid. If you noticed, I referred to the young man in the past tense. That’s right. He committed suicide. Why? It seems this “bad kid” had just made his first ‘B’ ever on his report card, and he was afraid to go home and tell his dad.

Could this young mans life have been spared? Yes, I believe it could have.

Rachel’s Challenge is the largest organization in the world which focuses on kindness and compassion. Named for Rachel Joy Scott, the first child killed at Columbine High School, her story, the “story that changes everything” has been experienced by over 29 million people worldwide. About two months before her death, Rachel wrote an essay titled: “My Ethics. My Codes of Life.” In the essay she wrote, “Compassion is the greatest form of love humans have to offer. I have this theory that if one person can go out of their way to show compassion, then it will start a chain reaction of the same. You never know how far a little kindness can go.” Rachel’s story of reaching out to others transforms the lives of everyone who hears it.

Every year, Rachel’s Challenge receives hundreds of messages from students who planned to take their own lives until they heard her story. Many of the kids were going to commit suicide the very day the Rachel’s Challenge presenter came to their school. Coincidence? I don’t think so. I love the way Albert Einstein spoke of coincidence, saying, “Coincidence is God’s way of remaining anonymous.” Many precious lives have been saved because of Rachel.

So, back to our 11th grader. Could Rachel’s story have saved his life? I cannot prove it, but I am convinced he would have thought differently about taking his life. He would have seen himself as valuable, a person with a future and a purpose; a person much bigger than a solitary ‘B’ on a report card.

There is no shame in reaching out for help. Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death among adults. In 2016, suicide became the #2 reason young people died. If you or someone you know is feeling like they are done, have lost all hope, please call the Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800.273.8255. September is National Suicide Prevention Month, but every life is precious no matter the month. There is always hope…

Originally published at http://www.seeking-grace.com

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres. We publish pieces written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Learn more or join us as a community member!
Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

You might also like...

Community//

sHeroes: How Rachel Davis is helping high-powered, career-focused women win in love

by Alexandra Spirer
Community//

What if you woke up blind?

by Jared Latigo
Pamela Mendoza in a still from Melina León's 'Cancion sin nombre'
Community//

“To know in first person what it feels like to be oppressed”: ‘Canción sin nombre’ by Melina León in Cannes

by E. Nina Rothe

Sign up for the Thrive Global newsletter

Will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.

Thrive Global
People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

- MARCUS AURELIUS

We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.