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Positive body language: how to influence your mood

Body language is widely used in communication. Experts read non-verbal body signs to understand what other people really want to tell. We can read body language to see what others are saying or if politicians are lying to us. Often we use body language to read signs and clues of other people. We can use […]

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Body language is widely used in communication. Experts read non-verbal body signs to understand what other people really want to tell. We can read body language to see what others are saying or if politicians are lying to us. Often we use body language to read signs and clues of other people. We can use body language to improve us too.

If we use positive body language we can communicate positivity to other people. If we have a job interview or date or we meet our friends and we want to get the most out of it, then having an open body language that communicates positivity sets us up for the best experience.

A positive body language helps to boost our mood too. Experts show how open and positive body language can make us happier, more concentrated or more creative. Let’s see some body language examples to improve our mood.

6 examples a positive body language can improve your mood.

  1. Smile. Children smile hundreds of time a day whereas adults only a few. You can try to smile more during the day, with a reason or without one. Even just moving our facial expression to form a smile transforms our mood.
  2. Sit up straight. Studies show that simply sitting straight improves our mood. That could be challenging if our works is sitting at a desk for many hours. After a while, we tend to assume positions that can be painful for our back and decrease our mood too. Already being conscious of that, helps us to change our positions more regularly to be straight and therefore increasing our mood.    
  3. Walking with a positive posture. Walking keeping a tall position influences our mood. We pay attention more to positive aspects of our lives.
  4. Power posing. Do you want to get confidence? Use a power pose for only 2 minutes to feel all the energy. Power pose influences our hormones that raises our confidence.
  5. Laugh. If smiling has positive effects on our mood, then laughter enhances it. We can simply watch a comedian and boost our mood instantly.
  6. Adopt an open posture. We can open our arms and uncross our legs, use more space and it makes us feel better.

The points above are backed up by research, as explained by Happiness Expert Julie Leonard here. She also has regular meetings and discussions on how we can improve our mood and be happier. She also created Sunndach, a program to improve ourselves and be happier.      

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