Community//

My 2020 Reflections: Part 1 – The biggest Loss

My father, Md. Muhitun Nabi! I lost him on February 9 ,2020 at 8:45 AM. He had no pre-existing condition except diabetics but it was also in control. But on night of February 8, he sudden stroked and we admitted to him hospital around 12:30 am and in the following morning, he left us all. […]

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My father, Md. Muhitun Nabi! I lost him on February 9 ,2020 at 8:45 AM. He had no pre-existing condition except diabetics but it was also in control. But on night of February 8, he sudden stroked and we admitted to him hospital around 12:30 am and in the following morning, he left us all. It was a huge shock for all of us but in a sense I am happy, because he always wanted this type of sudden death.

My father may not be a highly successful man (in terms of materialistic wealth), but he lived his life fullest. He is my hero. He was a very religious man. He had a huge influence in my life. He always believe in me, he always told me that I will be very successful in my life (I guess every dad told this to his son/daughter). But the way he used to say that, it inspired me a lot. It also gave me strength to believe that yes, I can do it.

My dad retired as Principal of Government College of Commerce, Chittagong in 2004. He had lots of students who loved him for his guidance and honestly. With his limited income, he always tried to fulfil all our needs. In 1990 or 1991, I was 6/7 years old. We went to market and I saw a pair of cricket pads for kids (protective equipment used by batters in the sport of cricket). On that time, the price was around BDT 500, like BDT 5000+ in current time. I was a stubborn child, so when I demand anything, I need it, whatever it cost. My dad bought that for me after like I cried for 20-30 minutes. That was one of the best day in my childhood.

My dad was always serious about his job and responsibilities. He also loved to do gossiping with his student in the class and outside class. He used to tell me that his age is stuck between 16-22, as all his students in that age group. As he spend 6-8 hours a day with this group, so his age is stuck 16-22 years old. May be that’s the reason he was so progressive. I remember, at the age of 53-54, he learned how to operate computer and how to use MS word and type in Bangla bu using Bijoy (even still I don’t know how to type in Bijoy). He also loved to play Brian Lara 1998, desktop game. One of his favorite song is Habib’s “Din gelo”. He used to believe that it was a very religious song and I didn’t argue with him because actually it is if you think on that line.

From childhood, I was good in general knowledge and he was very proud of that. Interesting thing is, as a teacher’s child, he never pushed me or my elder brother to do good results. He was always concern about are we good in math and english. Even in my SSC or HSC, he never pushed me for distinction. He just told me to keep 1st class. Even in my BBA, he never pushed me for my grades but he was very happy that I had secured “performance based scholarship” in my BBA. Me and my elder brother, both of us graduated from private university. My dad completed his bachelors and masters from University of Dhaka, #1 university of Bangladesh. That’s why he used to say to me that I should try to University of Dhaka for my MBA, and I did it. On that day, he was more happy than myself.

From the beginning of my career, I have to travel a lot for official purpose. Every time before starting my journey, either I met him or called him for his blessing. Whenever I faced any hard times in my life, I used to talk to him and asked for his guidance. Most of the time, he told me to keep faith in Allah, Allah will show me the path. He was a very religious man, he hardly missed any prayers or even tahajjud prayer (also known as the “night prayer“, is a voluntary prayer performed by followers of Islam) since his teenage.

I gifted him a smartphone and within a week he learned how to use and he was a regular YouTube viewers. In September or October 2019, he called me one morning and told me that 2020 will be very successful year for me. I asked him why do you think that, he told me he saw a horoscope video in YouTube where an astrologer said that. We both laugh for a while on that. Today, I don’t know whether 2020 is successful for me or not but definitely the worst because I lost him.

I dont know whether I was a good son to him but definitely he was the best human, best friend and best dad to me. Please keep him in your prayers.

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