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Michael Giannulis urges people to indulge in meditation to combat COVID-19 anxiety

The worldwide spread of the pandemic has exposed individuals to the new normal. Higher authorities are taking significant steps to impose social distancing and self-quarantine norms. In this scenario, battling with stress, fever, and anxiety is common. With so much disturbing news all around, it is very tough to stay calm and composed. Hence, it […]

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The worldwide spread of the pandemic has exposed individuals to the new normal. Higher authorities are taking significant steps to impose social distancing and self-quarantine norms. In this scenario, battling with stress, fever, and anxiety is common. With so much disturbing news all around, it is very tough to stay calm and composed. Hence, it is essential to use meditation to provide relief to your senses and promote overall well-being.

Mike Giannulis throws light upon the following key areas

Breathe: breathing is a powerful method that provides stability to your senses. In case you start feeling anxious and depressed, close your eyes for a few seconds and take a few deep breaths. Hold your breath to the count of four and release it with a count of four. You will eventually notice a change in the way you feel.

Visual meditation: meditating in places and with people with whom you feel safe is vital. It is all about clearing your objectivity and thoughts and letting yourself with an opportunity to release your stress. Hence, performing meditation at the beach or at the top of a mountain surrounded by people you love is ideal.

Expression of gratitude: expressing gratitude is essential in trying times like these. It helps you to focus on those areas which provide you with comfort. Moreover, According to Michael Giannulis, it distracts your thinking from hostile areas. Hence, think about the happy moments of your life and be grateful for them.

Embrace natural light: if your house has big windows and open space, try to embrace the natural light. When performing meditation, experts suggest that there must be enough space and air inside the room. Moreover, you may go for a walk after your meditation and find a private space outside the house where you can spend some time with yourself.

Be kind to others and yourself: kindness matters a lot. People often show their vulnerable sides during a crisis. When you know this, you may extend extra compassion to friends, neighbors, and strangers. When you are kind to others and yourself, it helps in building a positive mindset.

When exposed to new challenges such as these, meditation is the best way of finding an escape. Simple yoga poses such as mountain pose may calm you down and also get your blood moving. You may also take to the stairs to keep your blood pressure proper. Along with meditation, the right kind of nutrition, sleep, and physical activity will ensure emotional wellness and a key to having a robust immune system.

You must possess the discipline for doing this in the right way without any distraction. Fear and stress can get termed as wasted emotions, and it must be a personal decision to overcome them. The pandemic has brought people to their knees, forcing them to look in different directions, which may provide relief to their senses. Regular meditation creates a shield in fighting against this deadly disease.

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