Community//

Inactivity childhood’s ‘Global epidemic’

The World Health Organization says that children's health is harmed as much as their brain development and social skills.

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Four out of five 11- to 17-year-olds around the world do not move enough after the first such analysis.

In rich and poor countries, it is a universal problem not to train the recommended hour per day.

Except for four of the 146 countries surveyed, boys were more active than girls.

Which exercise counts?


Pretty much anything that makes your heart beat faster and your lungs breathe harder.

This could include:

Four out of five 11- to 17-year-olds around the world did not move enough after the first such analysis.

The World Health Organization says that children’s health is harmed as much as their brain development and social skills.

In rich and poor countries, it is a universal problem not to train the recommended hour per day.

Except for four of the 146 countries surveyed, boys were more active than girls.

Which exercise counts?


Pretty much anything that makes your heart beat faster and your lungs breathe harder.

This could include:

“I don’t consider it a ridiculous goal,” says Dr. Fiona Bull from the WHO.

“It’s evidence-based to ensure good health and development.”

The difference between being moderate and strong is that you can still take a nap while exercising moderately, but during vigorous exercise, you are too breathless to chat.

To run To go biking swim Soccer bounce skip gymnastics.

The goal is a daily exercise of 60 minutes with medium to high intensity.

“I don’t consider it a ridiculous goal,” says Dr. Fiona Bull from the WHO.

“It’s evidence-based to ensure good health and development.”

The difference between being moderate and strong is that you can still take a nap while exercising moderately, but during vigorous exercise, you are too breathless to chat.

Are children just lazy?


Do these insights tell us something fundamental about children, and indeed about all of us, that we’ll crack on the sofa with just half a chance?

“Children are not lazy,” says Dr. Bull.

“This tells us something universal, but it’s not about children, it’s the neglect and failure of us to prioritize physical activity – and that seems to be global.”

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