Community//

How to Cope with WFH Stress

2020 will surely be remembered as the year in which we all became acquainted with the pleasures and perils of working from home (or, as it’s come to be called, WFH). Many of us have adapted to this transition remarkably well and actually managed to increase our productivity and quality of life. But the same, […]

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres on our open platform. We publish pieces as written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team and must meet our guidelines prior to being published.

2020 will surely be remembered as the year in which we all became acquainted with the pleasures and perils of working from home (or, as it’s come to be called, WFH). Many of us have adapted to this transition remarkably well and actually managed to increase our productivity and quality of life. But the same, alas, isn’t so for everyone. In many cases, the practice of working from home can generate stress.

Much of the time, this stress comes not from working from home itself, but from the way in which it’s done. If you’re struggling with the stress of working from home, then there are several tweaks you might make to your routine, to allow you to cope that little bit better.

Build a Routine

If you don’t have a routine to follow, then you’re not going to be as productive. It’s really as simple as that. Set fixed times for going to bed, and for waking up. When you wake up, get dressed. Even consider getting a suit/tux to wear for video calls if you need to. Get out of your pajamas every day.

If you’re tempted to have a lie-in, then that’s probably a sign that you’re going to bed too late. Make sure that you’re working the same hours every day – consistency will help you to avoid distraction. The time that you might otherwise have spent commuting can be devoted to other activities, like writing a journal, meditating, or exercising.

Stay in Touch

You might be surprised at the extent to which you miss the social interactions that work brought about. If you’re missing talking to people, then why not schedule a face-to-face video call at a fixed time every week, just so you can remind yourself that there’s a person on the other end of all of those emails you’re firing off.

Take Breaks

When you’re working from home, you might find yourself unable to distinguish between work mode and home mode. After all, you’re using the same building for both. If striking the balance proves tricky, it might be time to schedule your downtime and stick to it with the same intensity that you’re keeping your work hours with. Treating yourself to chocolates when you’ve performed a particular task can provide the push you need to power through.

Make sure that you’re getting the most out of your breaks. Don’t just aimlessly scroll through social media – if your objective is to deal with stress, then your Twitter feed is not going to help you achieve it. Fixed breaks of five minutes or so spread throughout the day will help you to maintain some perspective on your working life. You might come back to the task at hand completely refreshed, and solve the problem you were worrying about in a matter of mere moments.

Move things Around

One of the joys of working from home is that you can move from one part of the house to another, if you feel like you need a change of scenery. With that said, a fixed office space with boundaries (those exclude children and family pets) will allow you to form habits that’ll make you more productive in the long-term.

    Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

    You might also like...

    Work from home, stay healthy
    Community//

    10 Steps to Stay Healthy While Working From Home

    by Sherry S
    Community//

    How To Prepare For A Successful Return To Work After COVID-19 Quarantine Ends

    by Michael Levitt
    Community//

    Is WFH Making You Miserable?

    by John Rampton

    Sign up for the Thrive Global newsletter

    Will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Thrive Global
    People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

    - MARCUS AURELIUS

    We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.