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How to Avoid Burnout as an Entrepreneur

Building a business is tiring work. As profits increase, so does the responsibility. The stress can get overwhelming until one is both physically and mentally exhausted. People avoid burnout, or utter exhaustion, by balancing work with a personal life. The work matters (but so does rest). Entrepreneurs are responsible for maintaining this work-life balance. Taking […]

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Building a business is tiring work. As profits increase, so does the responsibility. The stress can get overwhelming until one is both physically and mentally exhausted. People avoid burnout, or utter exhaustion, by balancing work with a personal life. The work matters (but so does rest). Entrepreneurs are responsible for maintaining this work-life balance. Taking on too much responsibility or trying to replace a personal life with more work is one of the quickest ways to burn out.

Keeping a personal life could mean taking time off work or going on vacation. Some people will need to be pushed to do so, but it is essential. People are more than their jobs: they need variety. Having a personal life means having friends outside of the office and hobbies that are unrelated to work. Having a reliable outlet, like a hobby or a personal routine, can offer a distraction from everyday stresses and further personal growth.

Entrepreneurs could also distract from work by networking with people from outside of the business. Mentors, advisors, and others in the industry (and outside of it) can give guidance and add perspective. A collection of fellow entrepreneurs and other professionals can help keep one grounded and develop ideas. It’s also nice to know people who understand what it is to build a business, satisfy customers, and manage employees.

Regarding the workplace, all responsibilities and expectations should be clearly written down and communicated. Clear expectations provide less room for interpretation, exploitation, and micromanagement. When everyone has set responsibilities, everyone has a place. Responsible business owners delegate responsibility and may need to reassign responsibilities to prevent burnout.

It’s also a good idea to have a goals list or a public display of accomplishments to boost morale and encourage extra effort. They are usually held accountable when things go awry. It’s just as important to acknowledge their accomplishments and hard work.

Strong leaders find other ways to make work engaging and enjoyable. Entrepreneurs provide opportunities in the workplace for team members to learn and grow. People need to work with meaning and purpose (and maybe a little flexibility). Business owners should respect everyone’s right to meaningful work. They should also respect the personal lives of others, starting with themselves.

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