Community//

How Retail Employers can Avoid Employee’s Burnout

Burnout is an issue among all essential workers today. Grocery and food stock employees are no different. A recent study showed that more than 20% of employees are feeling burned out more often than not, while 44% are starting to feel burnout occasionally. Keeping our communities fed is critical during these trying times, and in […]

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres. We publish pieces written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team, and though they are reviewed for adherence to our guidelines, they are submitted in their final form to our open platform. Learn more or join us as a community member!
Nino Jefferson Lim TG Image

Burnout is an issue among all essential workers today. Grocery and food stock employees are no different. A recent study showed that more than 20% of employees are feeling burned out more often than not, while 44% are starting to feel burnout occasionally. Keeping our communities fed is critical during these trying times, and in order to do that we need to prevent the burnout and exhaustion that is on the rise.

Stop “Clopening”

‘Clopening’ is a dreaded aspect of retail work. The word describes when a worker closes at night and opens the very next morning, working 2 shifts with often barely enough time to sleep between. No worker wants to do this, and it can be permanently exhausting to have to do this multiple times in a month or – worse – in a week.

Don’t Lock Workers Into Roles

It’s good business sense to place your workers where they are best suited – if a worker is an excellent cashier, why move them? The reason why you should move your workers around from time to time is that lack of variety is a distinct factor in burnout. This is particularly true in roles that require very monotonous and repetitive tasks. Keep a rotation schedule to provide stationary workers the chance to move around – or just change up their daily routine for a time.

Make Appreciative Gestures.

It’s good business sense to provide your workers with signs that you appreciate their work. This helps improve retention as well as improve their work output. A happy worker is a good worker. Do something, even if small, to show recognition for the hard work that is done at your location. 

Listen to Them

Everybody wants to be heard. Hold one-on-one meetings in order to get a better understanding of what your employees’ needs are. This also is a good idea as you can keep an eye out for burnout before it becomes an issue.

All managers should be aware of burnout. Preventing burnout isn’t guaranteed, but it’s easy to put some basic efforts in. Ultimately, this prevention comes down to providing workers with a healthy environment and good management.

Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

You might also like...

Avoiding Employee Burnout | Richard Greathead
Community//

Helping Employees Avoid Burnout

by Richard Greathead
Community//

Are You Willing to Pay the High Price of Burnout?

by Kristin Heck Sajadi, M.A.
Signs of corporate burnout by Teyhou Smyth.
image by pixabay
Community//

Corporate Burnout

by Dr. Teyhou Smyth

Sign up for the Thrive Global newsletter

Will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.

Thrive Global
People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

- MARCUS AURELIUS

We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.