How Proper Email Ediquette Can Lower Stress

Since becoming a cornerstone of business communication, email has developed a unique style and structure which requires all business emails to be direct, clear and easy to read. As more people are beginning life as “remote workers” or “digital nomads,” proper email etiquette can reduce stress levels. Email etiquette refers to the principles of behavior […]

Thrive invites voices from many spheres to share their perspectives on our Community platform. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team, and opinions expressed by Community contributors do not reflect the opinions of Thrive or its employees. More information on our Community guidelines is available here.

Since becoming a cornerstone of business communication, email has developed a unique style and structure which requires all business emails to be direct, clear and easy to read.

As more people are beginning life as “remote workers” or “digital nomads,” proper email etiquette can reduce stress levels.

Email etiquette refers to the principles of behavior that a person should use when writing or answering email messages. It is also known as the code of conduct for email communication. Email etiquette depends upon to whom we are writing- Friends & Relatives, Partners, Customers, Superior or Subordinates.

The formality of your writing, for example, can vary depending on your company. Subject matter or other factors also come into play and must be considered.

No matter what you’re writing. Remember to stay professional because you lose control of an email once you click, send. Emails can be copied and forwarded to others indefinitely. So make sure you choose your words carefully. With the subject line, you want it to be brief and descriptive.

If the subject line is too vague or rambling, you may lose your reader’s attention. Every email needs at least one recipient, but if you’re including multiple recipients, consider using the S.S. or carbon copy field. This keeps those extra readers in the loop without requiring them to respond.

Make your greeting brief and friendly and address the recipient by name. If you know it. The first name is preferable if you’re familiar with the recipient. And use their last name, if you want to be more formal.

In the body of your email, start with your key point, so it’s easy to find and keep your writing concise and focused on your readers. If you need a response from your readers, include a call to action, so they know how to respond.

Also, if you’ve attached a file to your email. Be sure to mention it, as you reach the ending.

Offer a quick farewell such as thanks or sincerely then give your name and contact information.

Writing concise emails is a powerful skill that you can develop through consistent practice. Keep writing and learning and you’ll become a more effective communicator with every email you send.

Jerry Nelson is an American writer living the expat life in Argentina. You can find him at any of hundreds of sidewalk cafes and hire him through Fiverr, join the quarter-million who follow him on Twitter or contact him at jandrewnelson2@gmail.com.

Header Photo by Solen Feyissa on Unsplash

    You might also like...

    business-email-communication
    Community//

    Business Email Communication in the Messenger Era

    by Lesley Vos
    How to Build Accountable Work from Home Teams
    Community//

    How to Build Accountable Work from Home Teams

    by John Rampton
    Community//

    How To Develop Positive Relationships With Colleagues (3 Tips)

    by Jared Atchison
    We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.