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How dare you (not) be a CEO?

In the past 20+ years, I have been working for C-suite executives from major large corporations operating in Brazil. Strategic planning, Operational execution, Cultural transformation, Leadership development, Sales excellence and Team building have been our top priorities at those organizations with 75,000+ executives and managers somehow engaged with our tools and core consulting practices. And […]

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Red fox on forest track (Vulpes vulpes), Ashdown Forest, Sussex, England
Red fox on forest track (Vulpes vulpes), Ashdown Forest, Sussex, England

In the past 20+ years, I have been working for C-suite executives from major large corporations operating in Brazil. Strategic planning, Operational execution, Cultural transformation, Leadership development, Sales excellence and Team building have been our top priorities at those organizations with 75,000+ executives and managers somehow engaged with our tools and core consulting practices.

And I can tell you: C-suite roles at large corporations are indeed charming and aspirational for those willing to develop a rocket career path to the top of food chain. Personally, I have a tremendous respect for these men and women in charge of managing thousands of people, delivering billions of dollars in profits and serving millions of customers. They do have an impact in our world.


Still, according to recent researches, young millennials are declining job offerings from these large mammoths and are choosing to become tiny entrepreneurs or to collaborate with small/medium sized companies. Senior managers are leaving their jobs and taking with them a large stake of tactical knowledge.

That’s tricky.

Traditional command-control frameworks, once inspired in military structures, are no longer capable of assuring high productivity and long term relationship with employees. Job for life is not an appealing employee value proposition anymore to millions of people from Asia to United States.


Urban legends are popping up everywhere and are becoming the mainstream opinion about corporate life at large companies. See below top 5 urban legends about CEO daily life and personal profile:

1. Soul for sale
Success can be measured by the amount of your total cash. After all, who needs pure soul when you can buy every possible sin you might wish for and bargain for forgiveness.

2. Life mono-balance
The purpose of life is to be productive, influential and powerful. Life is balanced if its mono focused at corporate goals and professional achievements.

3. Vanity sin
Well, well. You know… that’s my special touch… What can I do? I have the mojo!

4. Palatial intrigues
Kings, Queens, Castles, Princesses, Dukes. You might think they were gone with the end of European monarchies, but they are still here, wearing suits and silk dresses.

5. Rocky heart
That’s a brain game. Good hearts are welcome at churches and schools. Corporate battles demand rocky and icy management techniques. Coaching skills serve you well if make your people do what you want them to do.

Not inspired?


Hhmmm…

Maybe I should tell you our top 5 counter-revolutionary arguments about how should you dare to become a CEO of a large corporation and, to be trustworthy thinker to you, point out our top 5 potential flaws that might block any attempt to really have an impact.


Top 5 Counter-Revolutionary Skills of Successful CEOs

1. Power to do good

2. Network with right people in the place at right timing

3. Lead some of brightest minds worldwide

4. Navigate at the top of human knowledge and technology

5. Have a long-lasting impact in the world


Top 5 Flaws of Unsuccessful CEOs

1. Develop scotoma (yes… you will have to check this at wikipedia)

2. Don’t have a Jester

3. Have private elevators

4. Lead troops without knowing the battlefield and the enemies

5. Forget that he/she shall rest in peace someday soon (might be tomorrow…)


No matter your choice, it’s worth to remember: nothing is permanent. In the end you will be referred and judged by your legacy and your impact on other people. It is human to aspire and work to increase your power and wealth. But it is divine to pursue and enhance your equilibrium. All CEOs must have that in mind.

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