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Gauging your Leadership Intelligence

Sometimes it’s easy to forget that even the best of leaders are, at the end of the day, ordinary people. What sets them apart from the rest of us is a wholehearted commitment to their people. The most effective leaders motivate and guide their team to give their best efforts. Leadership is a skill, which […]

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Sometimes it’s easy to forget that even the best of leaders are, at the end of the day, ordinary people. What sets them apart from the rest of us is a wholehearted commitment to their people. The most effective leaders motivate and guide their team to give their best efforts. Leadership is a skill, which means that it’s possible for any of us to polish up our leadership abilities to bring the best out of our people. To gauge your leadership intelligence, try asking yourself the following questions.

Am I communicating well? 

Communication is a necessity for success. Amid scandals and controversy, how you communicate with and to others can weigh heavily on the outcomes of your business. Experts in the field, like author and leadership guru Brian Tracy, attribute upwards of 85 percent of success, both in business and in one’s personal life, to the ability to communicate. It’s not just a matter that you communicate: you need to do it well. The secret to great communication is radical transparency. Transparency lets team members know how they’re doing and where they stand with performance. This transparency lays the foundation of trust, which is integral to positive company culture. 

Am I being optimistic in the face of uncertainty?

Optimism doesn’t come easily in the face of turbulent times. As a leader, people are looking to you to know how to react and respond to change. By being optimistic, you can be a force to uplift people and encourage those in distress. Optimism helps both you and others. Not sure where to start? A good place to start is by showing gratitude in tough situations for the things you have, like access to information that can guide you to make the right decisions. When it is difficult to look inward, look to those around you and praise the efforts of resilient colleagues who are making work happen in the face of adversity. 

Am I providing guidance and direction? 

Especially in uncertainty, employees will look to their leaders for reassurance and direction. Even though leaders may not have all the answers, it’s okay to confidently express doubt while maintaining authority. In situations like these, sometimes it’s better to ask more questions instead of pretending to have all the answers. The questions you ask should address their concerns, thus showing your employees that you have their best interests in mind.

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