Five Steps to Becoming a Conscious Business Leader

When I started Chipperfield Media back in 2014, I found myself wrestling with how to incorporate my philanthropic mindset with my business goals. In the traditional capitalist model, we’re conditioned to produce something—whether it’s a product, a service, or a platform—from concrete thoughts and actions. Once we’ve met quarterly and annual revenue goals, any extra […]

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When I started Chipperfield Media back in 2014, I found myself wrestling with how to incorporate my philanthropic mindset with my business goals. In the traditional capitalist model, we’re conditioned to produce something—whether it’s a product, a service, or a platform—from concrete thoughts and actions. Once we’ve met quarterly and annual revenue goals, any extra time or money that we happen to have leftover can be donated to an organization for a gold star of participation. This typical model, which leaves philanthropy as an afterthought, has never been enough for me. In my personal life, I have always thought about treating people with kindness, respect, and empathy or about lending a hand when and where I can, so why are these values being overlooked in the business world? Or, even worse, why are they considered a weakness?

This push and pull—between personal philanthropy and professional progress—continued for a few years until I started to find other like-minded entrepreneurs and business leaders. These people, and consequently, the organizations that they run, believe that a business’ role is to add value to our communities and contribute to them in any way we can; they live and breathe their values and this mission from micro to macro levels. Employees are supported and treated with respect and kindness, and philanthropic efforts go way beyond just a monetary donation as theese companies create intentional structure for change, such as a non-profit arm or a commitment to allowing employees paid time off to volunteer.

Their purpose as a leader isn’t just to move a team towards a collective goal but to consider all individuals impacted along the way. They must show this same consideration for those within the team as they do for those outside the organization.

I’ve always considered myself a high achiever and someone who is very action-oriented, but action without the right intention is the fastest way to burn out. If you think about the old story of “The Tortoise and the Hare,” in the race of business, the ones who last long-term are the ones who take intentional steps forward versus those who run around colliding with whatever they happen to encounter. That just sounds painful.

A business leader, or at least one that I believe has the most value in both their community and their corporation, can keep their eye on the big vision, keep others accountable for moving towards this vision, and nurture those who make progress possible—stakeholders, customers, and vendors. This person is the definition of a conscious business leader. They think and act with strategic integrity to support the entire ecosystem around them, both internally and externally.

These people, and consequently, the organizations that they run, believe that a business’ role is to add value to our communities and contribute to them in any way we can; they live and breathe their values and this mission from micro to macro levels.

If anything is clear, the world needs more business owners and leaders who lead with their hearts as much as their minds. So if you’re looking to get started, here are the five traits that I believe make a conscious business leader:

1. Be Values-Driven

Have the self-awareness to assess your values both personally and professionally. This will ultimately determine how you choose to show up and act every day. With clear intentions led by values, a business leader embodies this awareness and inspires others to do the same.

2. Have a Commitment to the Collective

A conscious business leader knows that they can go further with a dedicated team. Their purpose as a leader isn’t just to move a team towards a collective goal but to consider all individuals impacted along the way. They must show this same consideration for those within the team as they do for those outside the organization.

3. Be Accountable to the Triple Bottom Line

The triple bottom line is made up of people, planet, and profit. A conscious business leader knows that when you focus on people first, the profits will follow. Taking accountability for your actions and how they affect every part of the triple bottom line is important in establishing your strategic approach to problems.

4. Be Purpose-Led

Conscious business leaders are purpose-led. They aren’t just showing up to earn a paycheck or secure the next client. Their work becomes a mission that is fulfilling on many levels. Be able to answer the question, “What are you doing this for?” and be proud of your response.

5. Act with Intention

Whether it is with your time, schedule, work-life balance, or actions, always be intentional. This requires the ability to step back and assess the next steps with clarity before pressing the gas forward. Again, remember “The Tortoise and the Hare.”

I truly believe that these five steps are the future to building a great business. As a marketing success catalyst, I’ve learned that the clients who have these traits are the ones who are most successful in their marketing goals. Not only are they are creating an intentional path forward, their integrity is shining through in all of their communications. This allows them to share their story of impact through the value they provide in their business and attract like-minded customers. Marketing is just another example of a conscious act in business.

This person is the definition of a conscious business leader. They think and act with strategic integrity to support the entire ecosystem around them, both internally and externally.

Conscious business leaders are the future of capitalism, where brands are community-led ecosystems nurturing everyone who comes into contact with them.

Are you a conscious business leader? Connect with me on Instagram @CharlotteChipperfield, I’d love to hear more about your journey of leading with intention.

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