Dealing With Social Anxiety

Anxiety is serious and perhaps more widespread than you might think. Unfortunately, social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a common condition that has affected significantly more individuals over the last year, in part due to the challenging conditions caused by pandemic restrictions and disruptions. Pandemic-related issues are far from the only problem contributing to heightened anxiety […]

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Anxiety is serious and perhaps more widespread than you might think. Unfortunately, social anxiety disorder (SAD) is a common condition that has affected significantly more individuals over the last year, in part due to the challenging conditions caused by pandemic restrictions and disruptions.

Pandemic-related issues are far from the only problem contributing to heightened anxiety among us, however. The increased use of social media and other forms of digital communication have served to isolate some to one degree or another, limiting face-to-face social interactions and thus preventing us from practicing the social skills that will be important for our personal and professional development throughout life. Compounding the problem is the tendency for social media to expose us to negative, hostile types of communication that create stress on top of stress, sometimes with very serious consequences for the victims.

The good news is that SAD is a very treatable condition that need not doom someone to a life of anxiety, underachievement and isolation. The resource below presents a number of coping strategies for SAD and should be required reading for many.

The first step in dealing with SAD holds true for most physical and mental conditions: Recognize that there is a problem. For physical ailments, admitting there is a problem is relatively easy. If you are suffering from a broken ankle, cracked tooth or sharp stomach pain, you’re very likely to seek medical attention without thinking twice. However, with psychological conditions — SAD included — people may feel embarrassed or ashamed to admit there is a problem, much less seek help. If there is someone in your life suffering from anxiety, the most important thing you can do is reassure them that anxiety is a common problem that many people have overcome, and that help is readily available.

The overriding theme of the coping strategies presented in the resource is to take things one step at a time. It’s not necessary to forge 10 close friendships as soon as possible. Instead, try to cultivate one good friendship at a time. It’s not necessary to take on as many responsibilities as possible. It’s also not necessary to attend every social gathering, dance or party. Instead, try one — but keep trying, because practice makes perfect.

For more information about SAD and how one can prevent it from slowing their professional and personal development, please check out the infographic below created by The American Academy. It can not only be applied to students but working professionals as well.

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