Community//

COVID-19 Significantly Impacted the Mental Health of Adolescent Girls

Adolescent

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Corona
Corona

In this awful period of coronavirus pandemic, where for months we all have been beholding only deaths, fear, sickness, and the urge to survive, some people are reluctant to use this time for the sake of their pockets. They have been repetitively claiming to have made prophetic predictions regarding the advent of this situation in the past. These people display so much evidence to prove that even the smartest of religious people get misledby them. This is nothing but Coronavirus Christian Prophecies with the sole motive of garnering attention and winning advantage of this fear-filled environment.

Coronavirus and Mental pressure on adolescent girls

This has been a rough time for our health system, not only physically but mentally too. Studies divulgethat adolescent, especially girls, have been the major target of Covid’s attack on mental health. The impact is considerably greater among older adolescents than younger ones. However, there have been several positive effects, too,as adolescents’ gradual decline of substance use has been noted. Experts indicate quarantine and self-isolation being the prime influencing factors behind this surprising benefit.

This sudden cut-off from the social world has led to a rise in insecurities among adolescents for such a long time. They have not been able to attend schools and colleges, resulting in their lack of social growth. The option of online learning has prevented the unsolicitedcessation of education of many students, but it has disrupted the much-needed personality development essential for mental growth. The researchers have made shocking claims studying the impact of the coronavirus situation on adolescents’ mental health. They assert that the pandemic has worsened the already deteriorated mental health of our children, and one in three adolescents are prone to meet mental health disorders by the time they turn 18.

Restriction and mental exhaustion

The restriction from indulging in sporting activities, school functions, and a constant distance from friend circles has trapped the brains of adolescents to focus on only the screen of their desktops. This is dangerous as the brain cells are not getting the required boost, and those “feel-good” transmitters function well. The endorphins hormone plays a very significant role in protecting us from mental health disorders like anxiety and depression. But in the absence of high-level physical activity like sports, morning walks, jogging, and gyms, the hormone is not in the state of being activated, resulting in a negative warning for our brain working.

Adolescent girls face mental health disorders much more than their boy counterparts because of their sensitive and overthinking ability rewarded by the excess estrogen levels. The menstruation period has become tougher to pass as there is nothing else to focus on and skip thinking about the pain. The isolation has also led to an increase in irritability and frustration levels among girls.

Conclusion

The pandemic has been tough for all of us. But adolescent girls undergo a lot of hormonal changes that are both painful and horrendous. At this point, they need the constant support of peers and parents to feel that they are not alone. But pandemic has forced us into this loneliness which must be dealt with sportingly to emerge out victorious.

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