Brain Fog: What is it and why we have it

For people with EDS/HSD it is common to have other long-term conditions including chronic fatigue and brain fog. And although the reasons for this are far from being clear, there are many different coping mechanisms that can help. But before we get into the methods of treatment, it is important to understand what brain fog […]

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For people with EDS/HSD it is common to have other long-term conditions including chronic fatigue and brain fog. And although the reasons for this are far from being clear, there are many different coping mechanisms that can help. But before we get into the methods of treatment, it is important to understand what brain fog is and what commonly exacerbates for those with chronic illness.

Brain fog is often described as feeling confused, being unable to process information, or forgetting things for no apparent reason. In those with HSD/EDS it is thought that brain fog may be related to the lack of blood flow to the brain due to blood pooling in the legs because of stretchy veins. And although there is still more research to be done, it appears that brain fog is more common in those with POTS secondary to their EDS/HSD diagnosis.

Vitamin and mineral deficiencies can also cause or worsen brain fog. Making sure that you are eating a healthy balanced diet is important, and often if symptoms are severe, your doctor will order blood panels to find out if there are any specific deficiencies. Common deficiencies that are associated with brain fog include anemia (iron deficiency), vitamin D, vitamin B, and potassium.

Staying hydrated, having a good diet, avoiding caffeine and sugar, exercising, good sleep hygiene, and pacing yourself are all important factors that need to be implemented in order to help reduce brain fog. Exercises may seem like it will make you more fatigued, but really it can help produce adrenaline and other hormones that can make you feel more energized.


Be sure to consult with your primary care physician or other medical professionals in regards to brain fog. This text cannot and should not replace advice from the patient’s healthcare professionals. Any person who experiences symptoms or feels that something may be wrong should seek individual professional help for evaluation and/or treatment. This information is for guidance only and is not intended to provide professional medical advice. If you have any questions feel free to email us at info@actifypt.com.

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