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5 Myths About Frozen Food

Healthy Frozen Indian foods

ready to eat

Healthy Frozen Indian foods

Generally, people have this preconceived notion that frozen food is unhealthy. But, that is not the case. Even if the food is frozen, it does not lose its nutritional value. Freezing has nothing to do with the calorie count, the fibre content or the number of minerals. The nutritional value will be there even after freezing.

Here are some of the most talked myths that are affecting the majority of Indian frozen food consumption level:

Fresh food is healthier than frozen food
Sometimes frozen food has more nutritional value than fresh food. Yes, that is true.  Fresh food is generally picked up before it starts to ripe, and then packaged, and then shipped, and then stocked. Contrary to popular belief, fresh food typically loses its nutrients like Vitamins and minerals, within three days of being freshly picked. Whereas, the best-frozen meals are harvested at peak ripeness and flash-frozen within hours.

All frozen food is high in sodium
In today’s world food manufacturers target in making and manufacturing food which is healthy because their primary motive is to meet the demands of the health-conscious people. However, maximum food manufacturers are focusing on meeting the requirements of health-conscious consumers, which means they target in producing, low-sodium a lot of low-calorie, foods that are filled with vegetables, grains, and lean proteins whereas people have a misconception that frozen Indian foods are high in sodium.

Refreezing previously-frozen food is terrible
If you defrost the frozen food in the refrigerator instead of the counter can be stored again, but vice-versa is not possible. You might have to throw the food out as you cannot return the food to the fridge safely. Wondering how long you can store the food on the counter? When you leave the food at a temperature of 40°F – 140°F for more than two hours, it’s bacteria bonanza, where bacteria proliferate which can make you sick. Refreezing might change the texture and flavour, and it’s better if you dump instead of giving it a second run.

Frozen food is expensive
Healthy Frozen Indian foods can be a cheap and easy way to eat food. Frozen food is likely less expensive and fresh. Frozen goods are kept in the freezer within an hour from the time they are picked. So this way its nutrients are intact and the food stays fresh and healthy. Packaged frozen dinners are often much healthier and much cheaper than takeout or delivery.

Packaged foods can go straight into the freezer
Most foods you buy at the grocery store are meant for fresh consumption, not frozen storage. If you plan to put them into your fridge for later, you need to prepare them with proper storage techniques.

You can now pick India’s most trusted brand in the USA also. Haldiram ready to eat range serves the best quality frozen Indian food to ensure you don’t crave for the home-like delicacies when you are out for a job or studying abroad.

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