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Good Treatment Options For Allergic Asthma

Manage the symptoms of allergic asthma, effectively.

Bronchodilators are one of the good treatment options that offers quick relief in case of allergic asthma symptoms.

Inflammation and obstruction of the airways are some factors known to cause allergic asthma. This is triggered by smoke, dust, pollens, cold weather and chemical fumes. Since it may be difficult to avoid some of these allergens, there are good treatments options that can help maintain or even rid off the symptoms.

Short-Acting Bronchodilators

This is one of the most common treatments recommended by doctors. They are light, easy to carry and offer quick relief in case of symptoms. Bronchodilators can be liquid, tablets, inhaler or injections, though most prefer Inhalers. The recommended dosage is usually twice a week. If it exceeds, then a stronger treatment is required. Always consult the doctor.

Inhaled steroids

Also known as corticosteroids, they are stronger and often used when bronchodilators are not working. They control asthma over long periods by reducing mucus inflammation in the airways. This clears the airways and helps reduce triggers to asthmatic attacks. Doctors usually recommend daily dosage for effective control. Inhaled steroids take time to work, in some cases, 3 months. asthma-control-with-anti-inflammatory-drugs

Long-Acting Bronchodilators

They are a ‘slower relief’ treatment that controls symptoms for a longer period, approximately 12 – 24 hours (asthma.ca). These bronchodilators work hand in hand with inhaled steroids to clear the airways. Therefore, you should use both. Just like any treatment, you may experience some side effects like headaches, anxiety and increased heartbeat rate. One should use them twice a day or as advised by the doctor.

Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy is administered as shots that should increase tolerance to substances that cause allergies. This is done through increasing dosage over time. The whole purpose is to harden your body to not react severely to allergies. Doctors usually conduct an allergy test, to find out what allergen affects you, before prescribing immunotherapy. Note that this is not suitable for children under 5years or those with heart diseases and uncontrolled asthma.

Monoclonal antibodies

These medicines are meant for patients with severe asthma. This means that you have not improved despite taking all the required medicines as prescribed. Monoclonal antibodies block certain body chemicals that trigger inflammation and lower the number of severe attacks. It is advisable to get a specialist to ‘screen’ you before administering the medicine. They are injected through the skin or given orally, only at the hospital. The specialist should let you know how long the injections can be taken. (www.asthma.org.uk).

Parting Shot

Asthma has no cure for asthma, but its symptoms can be controlled with these good treatment options. Always talk to your doctor or specialist to guide you on various effective ways in managing the attacks. With time, your lungs will continue to function well and let you maintain a normal life, without relying so much on medicines.

Originally published at zkago.wordpress.com

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