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“You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards.” With Ben Ari & Kat Meoz

It’s my favorite Steve Jobs quote: “You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. Because believing that the dots will connect down […]

It’s my favorite Steve Jobs quote: “You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. Because believing that the dots will connect down the road will give you the confidence to follow your heart even when it leads you off the well worn path; and that will make all the difference.” There have been a lot of people who have come and gone on the path of my career and I have truly had to trust that all of it was in my best interest and looking back I feel confident so far that it was. I think of this quote whenever I am making a decision based on a feeling I can’t shake, it’s been very comforting to me in times of turmoil.


I had the pleasure to interview Kat Meoz.

In-your-face stadium sized noise, mixed with an irresistible touch of gritty pop is exactly what you can expect from the majestic self-titled rockstar, Kat Meoz.

Already a singer & songwriter from a young age, Kat Meoz expanded her impressive vocal range in college, learning how to scream and master both brash and delicate styles simultaneously. Slowly crafting her sound, Kat Meoz merged her voice with her love for guitar music to form an epic ‘swagger rock’ sound. A sound which has put her under a growing spotlight for the past few years.

Talking about her latest single ‘Back For More’, she explains:

“I wrote this song with producers Jake Bowman and Teddy Roxpin. We actually reworked the entire song after sitting on the first version for about a year. It was my idea to get back in and gut it down to just the lyrics. They feed the concept that I’m always working on some new project and that I’ll be back to show an audience more if they can keep tuned in. I knew I loved these lyrics from our first version but that version wasn’t the swagger rock sound that I wanted yet. It’s a great feeling when you can reach out to producers a year later, throw out a completely new idea to redo the melody and instrumentation, and and be met with excitement to get back together“

“I hope this song speaks to anyone who is gunning to come back for more in any aspect of their life”

“I find that the energy used when making a song really influences the songs eventual journey into the world; which is why the idea of coming back for more is more relatable than ever. Many people right now are honing in on their craft and working on projects just waiting for the moment they can share it with an audience who are ready to receive it. I hope this song speaks to anyone who is gunning to come back for more in any aspect of their life. I find it very empowering to sing it, and listening to it also gets me feeling fired up and ready for a new normal to commence“


Thank you so much for doing this with us Kat! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

Igrew up in Las Vegas and my mom had a sixth sense to push me towards an early career in entertainment, she had me doing some news segments on how to discipline your child around the age of 5, I was always the kid asked to sing the solo in school and began acting more seriously around the age of 10 in local theatre productions. By high school I was acting and singing all the time and going to college to further my studies was only natural, eventually I transferred to college in Los Angeles where my real education in the entertainment industry began and led to a career in many trades.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

I could always sing and I loved any opportunity to sing live. I had my first taste of recording an original song when I was 20 living in New York City for the summer. It was a life changing experience to collaborate with another writer and record our idea in the studio. Once I got back to LA I was looking for every opportunity to record and it led me to go to a vocational school called MI where I focused on learning guitar and learning how to record music myself. I wanted to be able to record whenever I wanted and make good quality music, even if I couldn’t get into a studio.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

I think the butterfly effect of this world makes you look back at your path and realize how important each person that comes and goes is. There are people who come into my life for short periods of time, believe in me incredibly and introduce me to more people, who give me opportunities that lead to incredible opportunities. I met a woman who booked a show for me that went so well it led to my playing The Troubadour and because of that show a company from NYC reached out to me asking me to represent the city of West Hollywood as a musician for a global tourism campaign. That was a great experience shooting for a week with that crew, and truly unique. It taught me a lot about what I’m capable of.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

There’s two types of musicians in the world. The kind that off stage are always playing guitar and singing loud for everyone to hear, you’ve seen these people at BBQs, or when they come to your house and see you have a guitar and can’t help but pick it up and start playing and singing. Then there are those who keep their talents to themselves in public, until it’s time to let the beast out on stage, in rehearsal or the studio. I’m the ladder type, I don’t need the attention full time, when people meet me and they say “Oh you’re a singer? Sing something,” I don’t. There have been times when maybe my lack of interest in being a dog who barks when they are told to, has been a crutch of sorts but I look back and laugh at myself. I was working in a recording studio and Will.I.Am was there everyday working on different projects from Black Eyed Peas to Nicole Scherzinger. I was always around to talk to artists and they saw me enough to get used to me. One day Will walked up to me and he said “Kat! I heard you can sing!” and instead of singing on the spot, or saying yeah let me sing for you, or play you something I wrote or whatever, I just said “Yeah man, I can!” And he looked at me sort of puzzled that I wasn’t offering up my vocal chords in the moment, and he said “Cool!” and walked away. I look back at that and all I can do is laugh at myself. Alternatively I remember that even before that interaction, I did take a chance and played huge producers like Max Martin and Dr. Luke my early rock music I was writing, and they didn’t see my potential at all. So it’s a mixed bag you just have to do your best, you just have to laugh and believe that dots will connect when you look backwards.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

I’m excited because producers have started finding me and sending me instrumentals to listen to and write to, it’s a great position to be in. I am meeting people from all over the world and collaborating, just today a producer from India sent me tracks out of the blue that I’m really excited to write to.

We are very interested in diversity in the entertainment industry. Can you share three reasons with our readers about why you think it’s important to have diversity represented in film and television? How can that potentially affect our culture?

All artists filter their experiences into creativity, and so the diversity offered in film and television by way of actors, musicians, writers, directors and production companies is important to educate those who are uncultured and sheltered. You learn so much about your own existence when learning about worlds far outside of your own, it is paramount to the growing need for universal love and understanding. It is a gift to be able to live in this digital age and have so much access to learn about other cultures, laws, history etc, and it is a catalyst for personal and global evolution.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

  1. I wish someone had told me you don’t have to talk to other people’s lawyers until you have your own. Very early in my career I had a huge opportunity but there was some tension between a manager and producer on the project, they let things escalate and one of them got a lawyer involved. The lawyer conference called me with no notice while I was out driving around, and at the age of 20 I thought I had to answer to a lawyer right then and there. None of that situation was my beef, but I look back and wish I’d known not to answer anything until I had my own lawyer. I would have liked that deal to have gone through but the two guys heading that project had an unusual amount of drama.
  2. Stemming off of that I wish someone had told me to let it go and dust myself off immediately, get back to making new music. but as a young person new to Hollywood with no one in my family working in the entertainment industry, I didn’t know how many opportunities would be out there for me after that connection was lost.
  3. Third wish is I wish someone had told me about Soundcloud when it first started and to just throw my songs up on there. I had no idea about a lot of resources and being a perfectionist can really hold you back. Sky Ferreira put up an early EP that made waves on Soundcloud and the music I was making at the time was just as good but I didn’t know better or trust what I had, so trust in your talent and don’t worry about perfection, take chances and research resources so you are in the know.
  4. I wish someone had told me to say yes to every show, I turned down a lot of shows over the years because I didn’t have band members available to play with me, but I could have easily just played the show acoustic by myself and grown from it, who knows who I would have met along the way. I had this idea that my music wouldn’t be received well unless it sounded just like the recording. A lot of my opportunities came out of playing live shows and meeting people afterwards, so I look back and feel I should have taken more chances on my solo acoustic guitar performance. Say yes!
  5. And as a segway I wish I had booked a solo tour across America and to other countries when I was first starting out, nothing was in the way of me getting in the car with my acoustic guitar and driving cross country for shows. Again I had this idea it had to be a full band production, it doesn’t. Just go for it.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

Keep researching companies in your field, keep cold emailing your music catalogue to the people you want to work with, someone will bite if the music is good.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

Right now the most important movement is the black lives matter movement, if people loved black people the way they love black culture and music the world would be a better place filled with more peace, love and acceptance. It’s important to get educated on whose in office, so we can make lasting change the next time we vote. Please make a point to vote anti-racist leaders into office in 2020.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

Yeah when I was working at a major studio just after finishing school I became friends with a producer/engineer named Eric Weaver. He has always helped me with recording projects and live sound and truly been the one I can count on when I’m in need for audio engineering advice, help, confidence. He is the best of the best when it comes to recording and mixing and he has never let me down. I look back at a long path and he is always available to share knowledge and accept jobs if he has the time. A couple years ago he was in a unique situation to find a guide and background vocalist for an Iggy Azalea project and he thought of me. I got to record at Westlake in the same studio Michael Jackson recorded Thriller at the first night, and the second night I got to sing for Iggy and it was special. What I loved about it is both nights I didn’t get the call to come in until almost midnight. I’m not always awake and ready to go at midnight but fortunately that week I was available with my phone volume up.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

Yeah I’ve already referenced a bit once in this interview too! It’s my favorite Steve Jobs quote: “You can’t connect the dots looking forward; you can only connect them looking backwards. So you have to trust that the dots will somehow connect in your future. You have to trust in something — your gut, destiny, life, karma, whatever. Because believing that the dots will connect down the road will give you the confidence to follow your heart even when it leads you off the well worn path; and that will make all the difference.” There have been a lot of people who have come and gone on the path of my career and I have truly had to trust that all of it was in my best interest and looking back I feel confident so far that it was. I think of this quote whenever I am making a decision based on a feeling I can’t shake, it’s been very comforting to me in times of turmoil.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

Robert Plant, my favorite male vocalist and performer, I would love to spend time with him and write music with him.

How can our readers follow you online?

Search Kat Meoz to stream anywhere, follow me on social media, share my music with your friends and if you want to be on my mailing list of occasional announcements go to katmeoz.com and sign up!

This was very meaningful, thank you so much! We wish you continued success!

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