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“You can only pour from a full cup.”With Beau Henderson & Koya Webb

You’ve probably heard the phrase, “you can only pour from a full cup.” Well leading is no different. Your leadership is directly tied to your own self-awareness. So I say, take time to reflect and work on personal growth daily. It’s also important to build a team and continue to work to make sure your […]

You’ve probably heard the phrase, “you can only pour from a full cup.” Well leading is no different. Your leadership is directly tied to your own self-awareness. So I say, take time to reflect and work on personal growth daily. It’s also important to build a team and continue to work to make sure your team is granted leadership development opportunities. If team members don’t feel like they’re able to grow — they won’t be as invested in the company’s growth. And finally, once you have a solid foundation, find ways to give back to your community to fuel continued growth and evolution.


Asa part of my series about “How To Develop Mindfulness And Serenity During Stressful Or Uncertain Times”, I had the pleasure of interviewing Koya Webb.

Koya Webb is an internationally recognized yoga teacher, celebrity holistic health coach, author, speaker, and vegan activist whose core mission is to promote daily self-care, oneness and eco friendly living to combat some of the worlds biggest challenges including mental health, social injustices and global warming.

Koya is the founder of Get Loved Up, an international lifestyle community and Yoga School that inspires mental, spiritual and physical health through an app, online courses, retreats, in-person yoga teacher training events and the Get Loved Up Podcast.

She is also the author of LET YOUR FEARS MAKE YOU FIERCE: How to Turn Common Obstacles into Seeds for Growth (Hay House, 6/11/19), which addresses daily self-assessment and mindfulness, understanding how to make fear your friend, and using the power of holistic health to heal.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Our readers would love to “get to know you” a bit better. Can you share with us the backstory about what brought you to your specific career path?

For several years of my life, track and field was what I ate, slept and breathed. And my track dreams were big! Upon being awarded a full track scholarship for college, those dreams evolved to include the Olympics. Competing against the world’s best and being a positive role model for other young girls and athletes, especially of color, motivated me every day. My numbers were good enough that this wasn’t a wild idea. With hard work and enough training, it could happen. “This is my future,” I thought.

However, those dreams were deferred after a back injury which I later found out was a stress fracture. I was sidelined and devastated.

After I broke down sobbing in class one time too many, my teacher sent me to a counselor. While I don’t remember her name, what I do remember — vividly — is that she suggested I try yoga. Having been raised in a traditional Southern Baptist household, I was apprehensive. In my mind, yoga was about worshipping Buddha!

However, lacking any other ideas, I tried yoga. Despite my inflexibility and the general discomfort in the first class, I learned the importance of the breath. And boy did it feel good. It was enough for me to continue coming back to yoga for my body — but more importantly for my spirit.

In time, I decided I wanted to teach others. I wanted to share the life-altering power of a yoga and meditation practice. Over the years, I expanded my offerings but wellness and healing have always been at the core. Yoga healed me and through it, I’m blessed to pay it forward and help others heal themselves.

Can you share the most interesting story that happened to you since you started your career?

This moment — this collective moment of navigating what the coronavirus means for each of us and the world at large. I had reached a point in my career and life in which I felt I had a healthy amount of freedom. And now, most of us are on house arrest, which I positively flip to “staycation” most of the time. We’re each figuring out what that means for us and how we’re affected — because for the first time, it seems no one is immune to the effects of something happening in the world.

I’m more grateful than ever for my mindfulness practice. It’s how I deal with the external chaos and still have space and energy to serve others. And as an unexpected result of this newfound “prison” I’ve found myself feeling more connected to my family, friends and community than I’ve ever been.

What advice would you give to other leaders about how to create a fantastic work culture?

You’ve probably heard the phrase, “you can only pour from a full cup.” Well leading is no different. Your leadership is directly tied to your own self-awareness. So I say, take time to reflect and work on personal growth daily. It’s also important to build a team and continue to work to make sure your team is granted leadership development opportunities. If team members don’t feel like they’re able to grow — they won’t be as invested in the company’s growth. And finally, once you have a solid foundation, find ways to give back to your community to fuel continued growth and evolution.

Is there a particular book that made a significant impact on you? Can you share a story or explain why it resonated with you so much?

I love A Course In Miracles because it breaks down the complexity of life into two emotions: fear and love. Reading this book crystalized why it’s important to choose love in every moment. We all experience fear, doubt, worry and judgment which cause us to vibrate at a lower frequency than love. It taught me we can use gratitude, self-reflection, and unconditional love to raise our vibration and return to love consciousness.

Ok, thank you for all that. Now let’s move to the main focus of our interview. From your experience or research, how would you define and describe the state of being mindful?

Being mindful is acknowledging your fears but living a life that causes the least amount of harm to yourself, others and the world. It’s about being able to observe your actions, your strengths and weaknesses with grace and compassion.

This might be intuitive to you, but it will be instructive to spell this out. Can you share with our readers a few of the physical, mental, and emotional benefits of becoming mindful?

Physically when you’re more mindful, you realize that what you eat affects not only your body but others and the world.

Mentally when you’re more mindful, you realize what you think affects you, others and the world.

Emotionally when you’re more mindful, you realize what you feel has an impact on your experience, the experience of others and what we experience in the world.

As such, an example of a mindful eating practice is a plant-based diet, which allows you to consume more nutrient-rich foods. When you’re eating nutrient-rich food, you’ll feel lighter, more awake, more energetic. You will bring those positive feelings into your relationships. And finally, by eating a plant-based diet, you are decreasing your carbon footprint on the world.

Thinking solely of the benefits of one person doesn’t reveal how connected we all are — not just in how we eat but in everything we do.

Ok. Here is the main question of our discussion. The past 5 years have been filled with upheaval and political uncertainty. Many people have become anxious from the dramatic jolts of the news cycle. The fears related to the coronavirus pandemic have only heightened a sense of uncertainty, anxiety, fear, and loneliness. From your experience or research what are five steps that each of us can take to develop mindfulness and serenity during such uncertain times? Can you please share a story or example for each.

Set Boundaries: The most important thing you can do for your wellbeing is to set healthy boundaries. Everything you do flows from there. As a giver, this has been a hard lesson for me. Before Coronavirus hit, I had been caring for my aunt and she unexpectedly wanted to extend her stay with me during a month when I planned to run a yoga teacher training in my home. I was already feeling pretty drained, making sure my aunt had everything she needed while maintaining a full schedule of work, but I didn’t stress out. I recognized this as a healthy distraction and thought, well, I’ll figure it out. I wasn’t going to cancel the training. It was too important to me and to the 12 women who’d signed up. Maybe I’d have to get another assistant to help with the training. But the most important thing I did was talk to my aunt and let her know what was happening and that I might not be as available to her during those few weeks. She appreciated knowing the situation and was completely understanding.

To help set boundaries, make sure you tune into your own feelings. If discomfort or resentment is coming, it’s likely time to have a conversation about boundaries. Determine what you need in a situation and then outline a path that allows you to get there in a compassionate way.

Managing your diet: I’ll always be a proponent of a plant-based diet as it supports my optimal health and the health of the planet. I recommend giving it a try as it’ll boost your energy, improve your digestion, and minimize your risk of chronic disease. To help get you started try: incorporating a smoothie and salad a day. They’re so many creative ways to make both, and they’re packed full of nutrients and vitamins.

Through a Get Loved Up membership, we also offer tons of plant-based recipes to try!

Journaling: Morning is my favorite time to get my feelings onto paper. First thing, before you even get out of bed, write down what you feel. Don’t overthink it. Just do a stream-of-consciousness, in-the-moment brain dump. I do this every morning as a way of checking in with myself and making sure my feelings and actions are in alignment. If I notice that I’m filling my morning pages with negative emotions such as sadness, stress, or frustration, I know I’m not in alignment and I need make a change somewhere in my life and nurture myself more.

Yoga: Yoga is a great way to improve your fitness and flexibility but it is more than just pretty poses. Many people don’t know — until they experience it — that yoga is deeply and profoundly healing. My practice of yoga led me out of one of the darkness periods of my life. When I thought I had lost everything with the track injury, yoga healed me physically, mentally and spiritually.

Many people who have never tried yoga think that it’s only for the flexi-bendy types. But that couldn’t be further from the truth. Start with a beginner’s class. Feel the discomfort or the awkwardness and just keep going back. You won’t regret it!

Breathwork: Breathing is something you just “do” automatically in order to survive, but you can breathe mindfully to help you cope with stress, increase your energy, and clear your mind. There are many different ways to breathe mindfully but my new favorite is breathwork. Breathwork is any set of breathing techniques that help people work through blocked emotions or energy. In fact, I’ve found breakthrough to be one of the most beneficial tools added to my self-care regimen for its ability to help heal trauma and repressed emotions — many of which come up during periods of tough change.

From your experience or research what are five steps that each of us can take to effectively offer support to those around us who are feeling anxious? Can you explain?

  1. Hold space for them. Not everyone will be ready to talk the moment they’re feeling down and out. But if you notice, let them know you’re there and want to be of service, whenever they’re ready.
  2. Just listen. It’s not our job to always offer solutions. Sometimes people don’t want to be told to feel any way but what they’re feeling. Offer a non-judgmental listening ear during these moments.
  3. Tell them you love them. These words never get old, particularly during hard times. Knowing someone cares about you deeply allows them to feel like they’re not alone during hard times.
  4. Ask them what you can do to support them. Everyone wants to be met where they are and how they require affection and love. If you don’t know what to do — ask.
  5. Consider a new wellness practice such as tapping. Tapping is a great way to relieve stress and anxiety. I recommend the Tapping Solutions App to get started.

What are the best resources you would suggest for someone to learn how to be more mindful and serene in their everyday life?

I strongly recommend applying for the Get Loved Up Holistic Health and Yoga Certification. Starting this summer, this program will be available online. Your aim doesn’t need to be to become a yoga instructor as the course offers so much more than that. It really hones your mindfulness practice and expands the realm of possibility for your dreams.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Do you have a story about how that was relevant in your life?

You are meant to shine in the light and the darkness. Like the sun and the moon, you are here to bless the world with your brilliance.

You are a person of great influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

I would create a movement tied to what I’ve built Get Loved Upon. Get Loved Up: Love Yourself, Love Others, Love the Planet.

I would love to use this concept to spread love-consciousness mentally, spiritually, and physically worldwide, one breath at a time.

What is the best way our readers can follow you online?

Instagram: @KoyaWebb

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/KoyaWebbOnline/

Twitter: @KoyaWebb

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/koya-webb-6775bb75/

Website: www.koyawebb.com

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