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Why You Should Protect Your Skin

Despite how much our skin works to protect us, there are a number of common afflictions that affect it. The causes of these skin problems can be allergies, bacteria, and any number of other sources. These can be very trying and worrying, but luckily, there are many different solutions to deal with these skin problems. […]

how to deal with skin problems

Despite how much our skin works to protect us, there are a number of common afflictions that affect it. The causes of these skin problems can be allergies, bacteria, and any number of other sources. These can be very trying and worrying, but luckily, there are many different solutions to deal with these skin problems.

Pores

One example of a common skin problem is having large pores, which can be considered unattractive and unwelcome. There is no actual way to make your pores smaller, though there are a number of ways to make them appear smaller. Washing your skin daily is one such method. Using skin care products containing vitamin A, clay masks, and face-peel products with AHAs and BHAs are other methods that can help to make the pores of your skin appear smaller.

Acne

One of the most common problems people face is the one most commonly deal with as they go their teen years: acne. The National Institute of Health states that this condition affects a person’s pores, which are connected their oil glands located under the skin. When the follicle that connects a pore to a gland clogs, a pimple is formed on the skin. This is so common that an estimated 80% of all people have had acne at some point. Washing the face to clear the oils of the skin is one treatment to lessen future break-outs though this does not affect already formed acne. There are also treatments that involve taking medication containing benzoyl peroxide to help with mild acne as well as applying salicylic acid to the affected areas.

Eczema

Another common affliction that people deal with is eczema. Also known as atopic dermatitis, eczema is a long-term skin disease. The most common symptoms one can expect from the condition are dry and itchy skin, rashes on the face, inside the elbows, behind the knees, and on the hands and feet. Eczema can be treated via the use of lotions and creams to keep the skin moist. Such over-the-counter products, such as hydrocortisone 1% or anything else containing corticosteroids, can be used to lessen the inflammation. Cold compresses also work in relieving the itching. Other treatments include antihistamines can be used to lessen severe itching or tar treatments for those who are not responding to other treatments.

Hives

A third skin problem that people face is hives, which are red and sometimes itchy bumps on your skin. Hives are usually caused by allergies to either drugs or food, though people who have multiple allergies are more likely to develop hives than others. Hives usually heal on their own without the need for medication, though antihistamines can be used to block or reduce the body’s allergy response and ease itching. In serious cases, the NIH suggests seeking medical assistance.

Moles

Moles are another common affliction that people have to deal with. These are growths on the skin that occur when cells in the skin grow in a cluster with the tissue around them. A person may grow new moles over time, usually around the age of 40. Most people have 10 to 40 moles and about one of every ten people have atypical moles that look different from an ordinary one. Should an unusual mole appear, it is suggested by the NIH to seek a medical professional as they are more likely to develop into skin cancer than regular moles.

Rashes

Rashes, or basic dermatitis, are yet another skin condition that affects a number of people. Rashes typically appear as dry and itchy patches on the skin. Rashes can appear all over the body, including on the face, inside the elbows, behind the knees, and on the hands and feet. Your doctor can help with developing a skincare regimen to help prevent rashes. Your doctor can also aid in learning to avoid what causes flares and how to treat the symptoms, should they return.

Wrinkles

A final affliction is one that everyone will have at some point in their lives: wrinkles. As a person ages, their skin will change and develop wrinkles, age spots, and dryness. Sunlight and cigarette smoking are also causes for wrinkles and skin aging. The wrinkling is increased both by the number of cigarettes and years a person has smoked. In terms of treating wrinkles, many products claim that they treat it, but the FDA has only approved a few products for this.

There are, of course, many other skin conditions that often affect people, but these ones are some of the most common ones that people have to deal with. There are many different ways that people’s’ skin are affected by the various conditions and there are even more ways suggested to treat them. We hope that this information has helped you in finding what help you needed.

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