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“Why you should meditate.” with Dr. William Seeds & Kelly Morris

It’s been said that if meditation was a pill, everyone would take it. It’s been incontrovertibly proven to do so many wonderful things, from better concentration, to less anxiety, to better sleep, to improved cognition. At this point, to not meditate is almost to self-sabotage. For women struggling to thrive in a culture that devalues […]

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It’s been said that if meditation was a pill, everyone would take it. It’s been incontrovertibly proven to do so many wonderful things, from better concentration, to less anxiety, to better sleep, to improved cognition. At this point, to not meditate is almost to self-sabotage. For women struggling to thrive in a culture that devalues them — a culture that instructs that their worth centers around their appearance and their fertility, a culture that restricts them through unequal pay, sexual violence and glass ceilings, a culture that has always valued the lives of men over their own — to not meditate is unwise.


As a part of my series about the women in wellness, I had the pleasure of interviewing Kelly Morris.

Kelly Morris is a world-renowned meditation teacher with over 25 years of experience and the founder of The Infinity Call, a subscription-based, guided meditation service dedicated to healing the lives of the all those around the world who identify as women by reconnecting them and their identities to the earth. Central to The Infinity Call is Kelly’s firm belief that when women heal themselves, they heal the world. Kelly has dedicated her life to serving women, guiding thousands to finding their truth and their inner selves, including Michelle Williams, Liz Plosser and Layla Martin.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Our readers would love to “get to know you” better. Can you share your “backstory” with us?

When I taught yoga 30 years ago, it was considered a strange phenomenon, exotic stretching for aging hippies. Today, yoga is as common as a glass of milk. I was blessed with standing room only classes and was on the cover of New York Magazine as a leading light and voice of compassion. I taught celebrities, traveled to far flung locations on private jets helping the wealthy breathe, companies wanted to do deals with me, producers wanted to put my Conquering Lion Teacher yoga training program on reality TV. Life was good, by New York standards. Throughout all of this booming success, meditation kept me sane, lucid and on track.

Then about 7 years ago, a series of personal catastrophes of truly biblical proportions began. I could barely catch my breath. A close relative died by suicide; another relative died with his beloved dog in a fire; a Buddhist colleague died in a cave while on a meditation retreat; my maternal grandmother died; my Buddhist community fell apart; many important, long-term friendships ended dramatically and permanently. It went on and on, one thing after another.

I started waking up in the middle of the night, sobbing. Sitting up in the middle of my queen-sized bed, surrounded by darkness, I had more water in me than the Atlantic. I could have watered the world and made things green again with my tears, there were that many.

One night, while I was sitting there crying, a gigantic, otherworldly voice filled the room. It was like a tidal wave, washing through me. There was no escaping this voice; it was everywhere and everything. It said, “It’s time. Bring my daughters home. It’s time.” The words filled me. I sat there, shocked. I didn’t move an inch for a long time. WHAT was THAT?

From that unbelievable night, The Infinity Call was born — a meditation practice created for all those who identify as women around the world. Hundreds of daughters returning home — after 7,000 years of this infernal patriarchy — to the Goddess, to the Mother, to the Earth. This guided meditation practice supports all of us to rise once again and sit in sacred sisterhood, all from the privacy of our own homes. It’s magical, and it’s the most exciting thing I’ve ever done.

Can you share the most interesting story that happened to you since you started your career? What were the main lessons or takeaways from that story?

Back when I was a teacher at Jivamukti, a colleague taught me the Ganesha puja, the formal sadhana, or spiritual practice, of India’s famously elephant-headed deity with the huge belly. I faithfully followed the ritual each morning, hovering over the Sanskrit by candlelight, intoning the musical sounds. One morning after I was done, I hailed a cab from my corner in the East Village and hopped in. I looked to my right and lo and behold, there was Ganesh sitting next to me, strapped in, in a kind of dayglow hologram. That day was the last time I did the Ganesha puja. Messing around in an uninformed way with ancient rituals can be exciting, but it can also be ignorant and potentially dangerous. I learned the importance of better educating myself before diving into attractive esoteric practices, no matter how enticing. I love Ganesh, but I wasn’t keen to share a cab with him, even for a block!

Can you share a story about the biggest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

Thinking that I needed something to start. Someone’s advice, someone’s permission, someone’s support, someone’s admiration, someone’s money, someone’s understanding. I didn’t, and you don’t. You just have to begin. It might be harder than you think it will be, but it is always easier than they say it will be.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

As a white woman, I recognize that I have extraordinary privilege in that I’ve had nothing but help from day one. The person that I’m particularly grateful for, however, and one that still stands out today, was a wonderful, Quaker ceramics teacher from my boarding school days named Eve Carey.

Eve was small and round, wore long dirndl skirts and held her gray hair in a low, dense bun. I wasn’t very good at ceramics — my pots were generally lopsided and clunky. One day after the other kids had left, I snuck clay into the bathroom across the hall to try something new. I took off all my clothes and lay down on the cold tile, moving quickly, looking towards the unlockable swing door hundreds of times. I had decided to make myself out of the clay. When I finished, I wrapped the wet clay in saran wrap and tucked it inside a drawer.

The next day I cornered Mrs. Carey after everyone had filed out for sports and showed her my damp lump. I’m small, but she was even smaller, and her eyes looked up at me widely. I didn’t want her to think I cared either way, but she looked shocked at what I presented to her. I offhandedly asked what was wrong. “WRONG?” she exclaimed. “WRONG? Nothing is WRONG! This is RIGHT. The proportions, the lines. Everything. This is YOU.”

What a wonderful, unfamiliar feeling I had at that moment. Eve was teaching me to trust my own hands, my own eyes and most importantly, my own understanding. She taught me that truth isn’t a far-away thing, hidden in an ancient tome or wedged in some guru’s third eye. The world encourages women to distrust themselves, to question their own innate wisdom, to always seek outside opinions and advice. While asking around can yield benefits, it can also leave us unsure of our own truth, of what is most important. Eve showed me that I could find the truth I was seeking by going straight to the source within me. Meditation reveals that inner compass, that inner wellspring of unassailable wisdom: one’s own.

Ok perfect. Now let’s jump to our main focus. When it comes to health and wellness, how is the work you are doing helping to make a bigger impact in the world?

It’s been said that if meditation was a pill, everyone would take it. It’s been incontrovertibly proven to do so many wonderful things, from better concentration, to less anxiety, to better sleep, to improved cognition. At this point, to not meditate is almost to self-sabotage. For women struggling to thrive in a culture that devalues them — a culture that instructs that their worth centers around their appearance and their fertility, a culture that restricts them through unequal pay, sexual violence and glass ceilings, a culture that has always valued the lives of men over their own — to not meditate is unwise.

As a meditation practice in the Sacred Feminine, The Infinity Call connects women to the original Mother, the Earth, allowing them to return to their foundational selves. Through our guided meditations, women learn to disengage from the patriarchal culture they were born into and that they breath the noxious fumes of 24/7 — fumes that distort, confuse and are designed to make women feel as bad about themselves as possible — to rehabilitate the spirit by engaging with the present moment, which is free of any patriarchal inflections. The Infinity Call provides women with a more accurate mirror of themselves, which in turn, allows them to make deep, meaningful changes in their lives and thus the world.

Can you share your top five “lifestyle tweaks” that you believe will help support people’s journey towards better wellbeing? Please give an example or story for each.

When I work one-on-one with someone, there are five daily, non-negotiable things they must do, or our work together won’t stick:

  1. Engage in intense exercise: mind-body balance means just that, and for most of us, the most developed muscle in our bodies is the prefrontal cortex. Engaging in deep exercise helps balance the score, granting the body as much respect as the mind.
  2. Eat properly: there are no prescriptions here, everyone is different, but eating well is key to mental and physical well-being.
  3. Sleep properly: happily, meditation helps considerably with this tweak.
  4. Meditate: continue your practice daily, become familiar with this beneficial routine.
  5. Dance One Crazy Dance: one dance a day, all out, no mirrors, full throttle expression. Scare people.

I’ve found that when women do these five things every day, after a couple of weeks, they often no longer require my services!

If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of wellness to the most amount of people, what would that be?

If I could connect every single woman in the world — every homeless woman, every woman in the military, every woman in prison, every woman across the world, near and far — to sit together in meditation, we would bring balance to life everywhere. When women heal themselves, they heal the world, and when they choose to meditate together, something almost otherworldly occurs. Patriarchy might begin to collapse under the weight of all that love, dying forests might start to turn green, rivers might run clean and clear, choirs of birds might create new songs and fish everywhere might jump for joy. When a woman meditates with The Infinity Call, it becomes apparent to her that she is the matrix of all creation — and this feeling, this confident self-recognition, is what I hope to instill in all women who sit with me on The Infinity Call.

What are your “5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Started” and why?

  1. If you pursue a spiritual path as a career, be prepared to potentially lose some friends and family. Your priorities may not line up with your peers, which could lead to strain on relationships. A spiritual career is often antithetical to a modern life, although that appears to be changing.
  2. People may begin to see you as a quasi-celebrity, making it harder for them to see you as the normal, failing, everyday person you are. The divide between public and private self can grow wide and painful.
  3. Manage your money. The intersection of spirituality and commerce is a complex and sometimes taboo subject. Some people may think you should have ‘transcended’ material reality and now only require one grain of rice a day to be happy.
  4. When your passion becomes your livelihood, the passion can be hard to maintain. Do what you need to keep your joy alive and well.
  5. Community is more powerful than patriarchy.

Sustainability, veganism, mental health and environmental changes are big topics at the moment. Which one of these causes is dearest to you, and why?

The degradation of the Earth hits me so hard that I often find myself on my hands and knees, unable to breath. When you experience the Earth as your mother and realize it’s being destroyed, it’s the same as if your birth mother was being attacked. For the longest time, nature for me was this pretty green thing that lived outside the window — beautiful, but not something to engage with. Rather, it was something to pick a flower from to make my house look better. I didn’t quite grasp that the Earth is alive, aware, teeming with consciousness and that all the constituents of the natural world are likewise awake. I am always reminded of Hubert Reeve who famously said, “Man is the most insane species. He worships an invisible God and destroys a visible Nature. Unaware that this Nature he’s destroying is this God he’s worshiping.”

Many of us have been taught to feel that nature is scary, hulking and dangerous — and when we feel this way, we don’t care when She is fracked, drilled and otherwise destroyed. This is why we focus so heavily on women of The Infinity Call rooting down into the actual, living Earth while meditating. When we develop a direct relationship with the Earth, we begin to care. Initiating and deepening this relationship is undoubtedly one of the most impactful things a person can do to move the needle on climate change. When we care, we act.

What is the best way our readers can follow you on social media?

For more information or to join us in our daily practice, you can follow me on Instagram or subscribe to The Infinity Call at theinfinitycall.com/register.

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