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“Why you should drink more water.” With Dr. William Seeds & Jaclyn Sklaver

My main goal is to help people understand food as medicine and an essential part of their health routine. What goes into our body effects what comes out in energy as well as disease prevention and treatment. Less prescription medicine, more whole foods. I also work with women designing workout programs to make women stronger […]

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My main goal is to help people understand food as medicine and an essential part of their health routine. What goes into our body effects what comes out in energy as well as disease prevention and treatment. Less prescription medicine, more whole foods. I also work with women designing workout programs to make women stronger inside and out. My focus in on weight training regardless of age or ability. I transition women from cardio to the weight room.


As a part of my series about the women in wellness, I had the pleasure of interviewing Jaclyn Sklaver, a Functional Medicine Sports Nutritionist and founder of Athleats Nutrition. She works with active general population through professional athletes including preparing guys for NFL Combine and current NFL athletes. Her specialties also include autoimmunity, hormone balance , peri menopause and gut health. Her work can be found in popular magazines such as Muscle & Fitness Hers and Men’s Health as well as CBS Sports.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Our readers would love to “get to know you” better. Can you share your “backstory” with us?

Ihave been interested in Nutrition since I was very young, starting in grad school. I was an athlete my entire life and always wanted to help people through nutrition and strength training. I was intimated by sciences in undergrad and took a different route. By the time I was in my mid 30’s I realized that I needed to go back to school to follow my passion for nutrition and earned my Masters Degree in Nutritional Sciences. I’m currently a licensed dietetic nutritionist in NY and FL.

Can you share a story about the biggest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

My biggest mistake would be underestimating my potential and value. Starting a business is full of trial and errors so I don’t like to think of things as mistakes as much as lessons, but I would most likely put more value on my services from an earlier point in my career.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

I wish I had a mentor and I feel that not having one has been a big challenge for me. I turn to my peers, sports agents, athletes and friends who have been successful in their businesses for advice. However, I’m paving a path that is very different from what other people have done which has made it hard to follow any proven model of success or have specific advice in my career path. Over the past year I have tried to connect with and meet other women who are working in the professional business of sports to grow my network of people I can turn to as more developments and growth occur.

Ok perfect. Now let’s jump to our main focus. When it comes to health and wellness, how is the work you are doing helping to make a bigger impact in the world?

My main goal is to help people understand food as medicine and an essential part of their health routine. What goes into our body effects what comes out in energy as well as disease prevention and treatment. Less prescription medicine, more whole foods. I also work with women designing workout programs to make women stronger inside and out. My focus in on weight training regardless of age or ability. I transition women from cardio to the weight room.

Can you share your top five “lifestyle tweaks” that you believe will help support people’s journey towards better wellbeing? Please give an example or story for each.

  1. Drink more water- at least ½ your body weight in ounces per day
  2. Cook at home- less ordering lunches and dining out, more pre-planning and packing meals
  3. Stand up for yourself- understand that eating healthy is for your long term health and you have a right to say no to alcohol and unhealthy food. Most people wish they could be as disciplined and focused as you.
  4. Get a structured exercise program to follow- structure will help with progression. Attending random classes doesn’t do much for building muscle or progression.
  5. Stop using plastic bottles. Switch to metal containers and fill them with filtered water to prevent hormone disruption. Plastic bottles raise estrogen levels in our blood.

If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of wellness to the most amount of people, what would that be?

If I had that answer I would be writing a business plan and pitching investors as we speak.

What are your “5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Started” and why?

  1. People will try to get your services for free, know your value and stick to it
  2. You will feel lonely or be alone, but it’s part of paving the path to the top.
  3. You will be ignored, looked over or passed up on even though you are best fit for the job.
  4. You will feel incapable at some point, and it may happen more than once. It’s your mind playing tricks on you.
  5. Network with as many women as possible to build a support network.

Sustainability, veganism, mental health and environmental changes are big topics at the moment. Which one of these causes is dearest to you, and why?

Mental health is always important. There is a big mental health aspect to nutrition which is often looked over. This includes body image and addictive aspects of food for comfort. Mental health also plays a big role in being a female business owner.

What is the best way our readers can follow you on social media?

IG athleatsnutriiton

T: @athleats_

Thank you for these fantastic insights!

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