Community//

Why urban life is making you miserable and how to find stability off the grid

Living in urban environments has been the goal for many in the previous few decades, but as we’re approaching the new decade, it seems as if nature is becoming more attractive than ever. The expansion of vehicles, massive factories, and various other pollutants is making urban life much less convenient than before. Not only is […]

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Two hammocks and a red sky: living off the grid

Living in urban environments has been the goal for many in the previous few decades, but as we’re approaching the new decade, it seems as if nature is becoming more attractive than ever. The expansion of vehicles, massive factories, and various other pollutants is making urban life much less convenient than before. Not only is life in the city becoming dangerous for our physical health, but mental and emotional wellbeing as well. If you’d like to find out why you should look for a getaway in nature that can ultimately become your home, keep on reading. 

Healing properties of nature

Spending time in nature or simply observing scenes of nature will reduce anger, fear, and stress and increase pleasant feelings. If you’re suffering from anxiety, you’ve probably learned that deep breaths and controlled breathing will help you feel calmer, which is where nature comes in. Bustling cities have almost no fresh air, but in nature, you can breathe deeply and relieve anxiety after being surrounded by such a serene environment. The more you’re exposed to nature, the better you’ll feel emotionally. This will also contribute to your physical wellbeing because your blood pressure will be reduced alongside your heart rate, muscle tension, and the production of stress hormones. For starters, you can put a simple plant in a room and feel more at ease, not experiencing as much stress and anxiety as before. 

Nature is not polluted as the city

How many cars or trucks do you see in the countryside? Or up in the mountains? Hardly as much as you’ll see or hear in the city. Not even sure which of the two is more annoying, and bad for your health. All the honking, rumbling and the air pollution they’re making is beyond detrimental for your health. Another major issue in cities is asbestos and its presence in modern home constructions. One of the most common and dangerous consequences of asbestos exposure is asbestosis i.e. a scarring of the lungs. The number of asbestos claims has been in the rise in the previous years, so if you want to protect your health, it’s best to think about starting life in nature. The last thing you need is a serious respiratory illness that will scar you for life. Respiratory issues, allergies, colds and flues are very frequent in big cities precisely because of such a huge concentration of people. Cities are dusty, germ-filled, and generally gross environments, which is why you should seek sanctuary in nature and start breathing fresh air every day.

You’ll be more connected

Time spent in nature will potentially prolong your life, but also help us connect and with the larger world as well. Spending time surrounded by trees and nature will give you a sense of community, but also reduce the risk of street crime, lower levels of violence and aggression between domestic partners. Greenery, peaceful surroundings, birds singing, the river flowing and other soothing sounds, as well as smells of nature, will have a calming effect on you making you want to look for new people and broaden your horizons by engaging in conversations and trying out new things.  

It’s good for your budget too

One of the everyday stressors is certainly money. But when you live in nature, you don’t have to worry about your expenses as much. Growing your food, not having to go to the supermarket and spend hours in traffic as much, but also taking care of only one property cuts your costs significantly. If you’ve had a country house alongside your home in the city, your costs probably went through the roof each month, even though you’d only spent a few days a month in the country. After moving to the country permanently, you can either lease your city home or sell it for good money, and start saving for the future, or maybe invest in your current home.

Final thoughts

If you’re sick and tired of the hustle and bustle of metropolises and you can’t deal with constant health issues, maybe it’s time for you to look for a new home. Moving to the countryside or up in the mountains where you can’t see as many vehicles, smell so many factories and be affected by all the pollutants, will have various benefits for your health. So, think about leaving the city and start packing your bags to ensure a much healthier future for you and your family.

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People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

- MARCUS AURELIUS

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