Community//

Why this cold & flu season you need to get to know your personal temperature range

While fever is often one of the first symptoms of those infected with COVID, a new survey launched this week reveals 56% of Americans don’t know what signals a fever. The survey was commissioned by Braun Thermometers for the inaugural National Temperature Check Week, which aims to educate people about the importance of knowing your […]

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While fever is often one of the first symptoms of those infected with COVID, a new survey launched this week reveals 56% of Americans don’t know what signals a fever.

The survey was commissioned by Braun Thermometers for the inaugural National Temperature Check Week, which aims to educate people about the importance of knowing your personal temperature range during this critical time.  

Your body temperature is a unique range because it varies based on a number of different factors, including age, gender, weight, physical activity and even time of day. The survey showed a clear knowledge gap as nearly 3 in 4 (72 percent) don’t know that genetics can affect their temperature, while others are unaware that food or beverage (58 percent), time of day (58 percent), or physical activity (35 percent) also impact a temperature reading.

Whether it’s returning to the office, dining out or entering a store, temperature checks are now a part of our daily routines in this “new normal.” The survey showed more 79 percent of Americans agree it’s more important to check one’s temperature now than during the summer, but when it comes to temperature checking frequency there are some key differences:

  • Since the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak, almost half (47 percent) of American adults are taking their temperature at least once a week.
  • However, 29 percent have not checked their temperature once since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak.
  • Despite being more at risk, older Americans appear to not be as vigilant with their temperature. Both Millennials (64 percent) and members of Gen X (53 percent) are significantly more likely than Boomers (33 percent) to check their temperature at least weekly.

It’s also important to get to know the different thermometers that are available and what are the different benefits. The survey revealed two-thirds (66 percent) of Americans are not completely confident that their thermometer is providing an accurate reading — which might be why nearly 7 in 10 (69 percent) check their temperature more than once.

Ear provides one of the most accurate readings as it reflects the core temperature of the body, while the increasingly popular No Touch is also a popular option as they are quick and comfortable to use.

Once you have the right thermometer, you can then start to measure your baseline temperature range so you have a good indication of what’s normal and what’s not. Giving you the peace of mind you need.

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