Community//

Why the term ‘hopeless romantic’ bugs me

It’s paints a rather putrid image for me, as if I am some hysterical woman running around London, desperate for even an inkling of male attention. It begs the question of romance being somehow hopeless for certain women. That there is a gaggle of gals running around every major city in the world, frothing at […]

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres. We publish pieces written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team, and though they are reviewed for adherence to our guidelines, they are submitted in their final form to our open platform. Learn more or join us as a community member!

It’s paints a rather putrid image for me, as if I am some hysterical woman running around London, desperate for even an inkling of male attention.

It begs the question of romance being somehow hopeless for certain women. That there is a gaggle of gals running around every major city in the world, frothing at the mouth at the thought of a romantic relationship. Going gaga for the L word.

Funnily enough, if you actually type ‘hopeless romantic’ into Google, you are met with the rather large sum of 25,000,000 searches. Just how hopeless are we? And man, that gaggle is getting pretty big. (Worth also pointing out that those 25,000,000 aren’t just women).

When searching for the term ‘hopeless romantic’, the first Google suggestion is a definition of what a hopeless romantic is. ‘A hopeless romantic is an expression describing a person who has romantic notions about life. For a hopeless romantic: life = love. Especially when that person is involved in a relationship – He/she thinks about love and romantic relationships in a different way than other people.’

Does liking rom-coms mean I have romantic notions about life? Does reading Jane Austen mean I have romantic notions about life? What about singing just for the sake of it?

Just because I do, or enjoy these things, does that mean I value love above all else and could be pigeon holed as a hopelessly romantic? No sensei, thankfully it does not. Also if, for a minute, life did equal love and only love, then what part of that is hopeless anyway? I was under the impression that love was hopeful rather than hopeless, but maybe I’m just an optimist.

What I really want to know is why there is such a lack of hope for women who like the idea of romance?

I reject that phrase, and instead prefer to call myself a hopeFUL romantic.

Because I am hopeful that one day someone will sweep me off my feet and we will ride off into the sunset. Just preferably not on a horse, because I’m allergic.

Emily King is a writer and founder of online female-led magazine The C Word Mag. She is based in London and her online magazine celebrates women and female expression in all forms by publishing content from women of all ages and all backgrounds to help elevate female voices. You can sign up to The C Word Mag’s monthly newsletter (featuring interviews from some incredible female entrepreneurs) via the website.

Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

You might also like...

Community//

Unmasking the Romance and the Reality of Love

by Amanda Obidike
Community//

Winning At Work But Struggling In love? The Modern Woman’s Dilemma

by Parul Tewari
Community//

A Modern Girls Guide to Appreciating Singleness

by Amanda Kuda

Sign up for the Thrive Global newsletter

Will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.

Thrive Global
People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

- MARCUS AURELIUS

We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.