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Why The Coronavirus Scare Resembles What It’s Like To Live With A Chronic Illness

Mass fear and hysteria of the dangers of this virus have people in a fight or flight survival mode. It’s in our human nature to run from a threat and to protect oneself and loved ones. Though interestingly enough, many people who live with a chronic illness have experienced this survival mode on an ongoing basis.

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As individuals, we all face unknown aspects of our lives at one point or another. Now as a collective, we are all in a state of unknown together regarding the COVID-19, better known as the Coronavirus.

Mass fear and hysteria of the dangers of this virus have people in a fight or flight survival mode. It’s in our human nature to run from a threat and to protect oneself and loved ones. Though interestingly enough, many people who live with a chronic illness have experienced this survival mode on an ongoing basis.

We know what it’s like to live day to day in the unknown. 

We know what it’s like to be scared. 

We know what it’s like to need to protect ourselves.

We know what it’s like to be vulnerable.

We know what it feels like to be overwhelmed.

We know what it’s like to wear a mask out in public.

We know what it’s like to worry and have anxiety.

We know what it’s like to live with a viral infection, that hasn’t gone away.

We know what it’s like to have a viral infection be the trigger or cause for our chronic illnesses.

We know what it’s like to stock up on items, just in case.

We know the importance of not being around those who are contagious.

We know what it’s like to need medical support.

We know what it’s like to need financial help.

We know what it’s like to need to self-isolate, and we understand why we need to.

We know what it’s like to need to cancel events or plans.

We know what it’s like to call left and right for medical testing and help.

We know how important it is to have proper hygiene.

We know what it’s like to need hand sanitizers.

What know what it’s like to need rubbing alcohol and prep pads, we use these before our injections. But now they are wiped out from store shelves, as people start hoarding.

We know what it’s like to need to work from home.

We know how important it is to listen to health care precautions and instructions.

We know what it’s like to be housebound.

We know what it’s like to miss out on things people take for granted.

We know what it’s like to not have a cure for something we live with.

But through the seemingly negative aspects to those on the outside, some positives come with battling a storm only those who have been through it understand.

We know what it’s like to enjoy our own company.

We know how important it is to cherish those we love a little more.

We know what it’s like to appreciate the simple pleasures in life.

We have a greater self-awareness for ourselves and the world at large.

We know that doing less, doesn’t mean you are less than or have less.

We know how important cultivating inner peace and calm is.

We know that feeding into fear and worry of the unknown only causes more stress.

We know stress makes us feel worse, and try to avoid it at all costs.

We cherish our time to relax and rejuvenate.

We know what a privilege it is to be alive.

We have empathy for another’s suffering.

We know how important it is to respect those who are vulnerable.

We know what it’s like to need to be an advocate for our own medical needs.

We know money, power and status aren’t as important as good health.

We know the value of self-care.

As we all navigate this unknown terrain, may we all take some time to take care of the parts of ourselves and our lives that we have neglected. May we lean into the good stuff that remains, despite what’s being canceled or postponed. May we all have more inner peace and enjoy the simplicity around us as much as we can.

*This post was originally published on Rising Above rheumatoid arthritis.

www.risingabovera.com

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