Community//

Why So Many People are Planning a Career Change Post-Pandemic

The coronavirus pandemic has shaken society in fundamental ways. Basic parts of life, such as waking up and going to work every morning, have changed. Instead, people are working from home or have lost their jobs entirely. These fundamental changes have affected women more than men. A large percentage of frontline healthcare workers are women. […]

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres. We publish pieces written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team, and though they are reviewed for adherence to our guidelines, they are submitted in their final form to our open platform. Learn more or join us as a community member!

The coronavirus pandemic has shaken society in fundamental ways. Basic parts of life, such as waking up and going to work every morning, have changed. Instead, people are working from home or have lost their jobs entirely. These fundamental changes have affected women more than men. A large percentage of frontline healthcare workers are women. Children being home from school, in most cases, puts additional burdens on female caretakers.

The result is a shift in professional priorities. AllBright, an organization that helps women network, did a study on the effects of COVID-19. They found that more than 60% of women plan to change careers. Around 25% intend to start a business of their own.

Surprisingly, most of the women interviewed feel somewhat positive about their professional futures despite the widespread economic downturn. The pandemic has given people a new perspective. With children attending virtual classes, many working mothers have had to balance childcare and homeschooling in unexpected ways. Being out of work has encouraged some women to go out for themselves. It has forced others to seek new career paths.

A number of women have no choice about changing their careers. An estimated 22 to 40 million people lost their jobs due to COVID-19. According to the McKinsey Global Institute, women accounted for 54% of those losses. This is due to a number of factors, including that women make up the majority of hospitality and food production workers — two of the areas hardest hit by the pandemic.

Those areas have been slow to open back up because of the ongoing spread of the novel coronavirus and the challenges of protecting customers. Job availability is still low, leaving women in those fields little choice but to change direction.

Many women have had to scale back their hours — or to leave the traditional workforce entirely — because of childcare issues. With so many children home from school, and so many childcare centers closed, mothers more often than fathers reduce their workload. Unfairly, women tend to earn less than their male counterparts, leaving some families little choice. With their careers put on hold, these working mothers are choosing to start their own businesses that will better fit their current lifestyle needs.

Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

You might also like...

Community//

How The Pandemic Is Negatively Impacting Women More Than Men, And What Has To Change

by Kathy Caprino
Community//

How Women Leaders Are Rising To The Unique Challenges They’re Facing From The Pandemic

by Kathy Caprino
Juanmonino / Getty Images
Thriving in the New Normal//

Our Caregiving Crisis Is a Values Crisis

by Arianna Huffington

Sign up for the Thrive Global newsletter

Will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.

Thrive Global
People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

- MARCUS AURELIUS

We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.