Why Moms Are Good For Business

Mothers are overlooked for promotions or challenging assignments because of assumed lack of time or desire. In extreme cases, mothers are flat-out told that they should be at home with their children. This way of thinking is outdated and incorrect.

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Working mom works from home office. Happy mother and daughter smiling. Successful woman and cute child using laptop. Freelancer workplace in cozy kitchen. Female business. Lifestyle authentic moment.
Working mom works from home office. Happy mother and daughter smiling. Successful woman and cute child using laptop. Freelancer workplace in cozy kitchen. Female business. Lifestyle authentic moment.

It is undeniable that the past few decades have seen significant progress in closing the gender gap. There is still much work to be done though. Women make up 70% of high school valedictorians and earn more Bachelors degrees than men, yet are still forced to contend with obstacles men do not face: glass ceilings, maternal walls, and broken rungs. And even then, they are still paid roughly $0.80 for every $1.00 made by men.

In many cases, women, especially mothers, are the victims of bias; leadership views them as less competent and less committed to their jobs. It is a serious problem for women in the workplace who wish to advance their careers. Mothers are overlooked for promotions or challenging assignments because of assumed lack of time or desire. In extreme cases, mothers are flat-out told that they should be at home with their children. This way of thinking is outdated and incorrect. Research shows us over and over that women are good for business. Companies with women in leadership positions consistently outperform their less diverse competitors.

Hiring or promoting mothers is a smart move if you want your business to succeed. In addition to their intelligence and proven ability to succeed, here are a few other reasons we think moms are good for business.

  1. Dedication and loyalty are second nature. Moms are notorious for their dedication. They are fierce advocates for their children, no matter what. If you don’t believe me, go to a children’s soccer game and watch the moms cheering as though these children are Olympic athletes (despite the fact that one of them will inevitably run the wrong way or score for the other team). She will bring this same enthusiasm and dedication to your business and be a loyal employee.
  2. Moms invented multi-tasking. Multi-tasking is second nature for moms. The luxury of doing one thing at a time is a thing of the past once you’re caring for a child, especially if you are also simultaneously balancing a career. Moms can make dinner, feed a baby, help with math homework, and pay the cable bill at the same time without batting an eye. As an employee, multi-tasking is a valuable skill, and you won’t find a more experienced multi-tasker than a mother.
  3. “Efficiency” is her middle name and organization is her game. Getting things done is the name of the game for mothers. With so much on her plate, checking things off her to-do list is paramount. The competing demands on her time make organization a vital skill. You would be hard-pressed to find a more efficient, organized employee.
  4. We do not negotiate with terrorists toddlers. But mothers do, and they will bring those negotiation skills to your business. Until you have convinced an over-tired, irrational four-year-old that a swimsuit is not appropriate attire for January (even if she wears snow boots), you shouldn’t list “negotiation” as a skill on your resumé. Moms negotiate all day, every day, and if they can convince a toddler that broccoli is tiny trees, they can negotiate the best deals for your business.

Research supports our theory that moms are good for business. A study conducted by the Federal Bank of St. Louis (by all male researchers) found that mothers with at least two children outperform women without children at every stage of their careers. It is clear that if you want a dedicated, efficient, organized employee for your business, you should fight against the notion that moms are too busy or preoccupied or tired. Hire or promote a mother…we know you won’t regret it.

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