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Why I Eat Grasshoppers…

While you may know me for Discipline — wake up early, stay in shape, “Work On Your Game,” etc — I don’t do all the same things every day. If I did, I would’ve run out of material years ago. I like trying new things, exploring new ideas outside of the discipline. Here are a […]

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Why I Eat Grasshoppers… Dre Baldwin DreAllDay.com

While you may know me for Discipline — wake up early, stay in shape, “Work On Your Game,” etc — I don’t do all the same things every day. If I did, I would’ve run out of material years ago.

I like trying new things, exploring new ideas outside of the discipline. Here are a few reasons why.

1) Expand my worldview and conversation capacity. Going “a mile wide and an inch deep” means you’ll know a little bit about a lot of things — so you can carry a convo with anyone, no matter what they do.

(The key to conversation isn’t talking, anyway — it’s asking questions and listening.)

2) A great idea can come from anywhere. When I used to post 100% basketball content, a random commentator once suggested that I take the on-court workouts that I did, compile them in a document, and share them with everyone else so they could train like me.

I took that idea and ran with it. My first $4.99 sale a week later made me an entrepreneur.

Later, someone commented, “Dre, you make all these HOOP Handbooks — but you talk Mindset too. What about a MENTAL Handbook?”

I wrote that book. Now, this is essentially what I do for a living.

Had I not been open to at least listening, I would’ve missed those.

3) A story to tell. Know this: Nobody remembers great information. Information is boring, even when it’s accurate.

But you never forget a good story. When you’re hearing a good story, you don’t even notice the time going by.

I’ve you’ve ever written a book, been a guest on a show, or done a speaking gig (or you want to do these), know this: Everyone has similar information. What makes you unique is the STORY BEHIND HOW you got that information.

A plethora of experiences equips me to make my information proprietary & “sticky” — you remember it because of the narrative that it’s tied to, not because I’m so great (well, maybe a little).

Ex: I’m vegan, with an asterisk: once per week (maybe more) I eat whatever I want. I recently went to brunch and tried “crispy grasshoppers”. They tasted like spinach and kale mixed together — like grass, basically. 

I don’t know if this experience will ever make it into a speech or book. But it’s different. It’s not the usual. And you’ll likely remember this more than you’ll remember 99% of anything I’ve ever said about Mindset.

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