What’s Your Passion?

For many people, having a great job, a loving family and supportive friends are the embodiment of a great life. For other people, that’s just not enough because they feel there’s a piece missing. Many hobbyists have passions that go beyond their daily lives but which are reserved for only them. It’s their “me” time. […]

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For many people, having a great job, a loving family and supportive friends are the embodiment of a great life. For other people, that’s just not enough because they feel there’s a piece missing. Many hobbyists have passions that go beyond their daily lives but which are reserved for only them. It’s their “me” time. In today’s day and age, there are countless ways to reach out to other like-minded individuals who share the same passions, giving people a sense of inclusion and community that humans hold so dear. The problem for many people is that they don’t know how to seek out a passion. Many experts agree that the trouble lies in searching with your brain instead of your heart.

Being passionate about something is a feeling. It isn’t necessarily logical. It’s something that brings enjoyment and pleasure. To try to calculate a hobby logically is an almost pointless exercise, just like asking friends their opinion on what they think you would be interested in. Only you know in your heart what you are truly passionate about.

If you don’t know where to begin, you can start by asking yourself a series of questions to try to narrow down the options. Ask yourself if there has been a consistent theme throughout your life, something you have always found yourself gravitating towards. Ask yourself what your ultimate fantasy would be, assuming money was not an option. Ask your friends how they would describe you since their answers might offer clues about your personality and perhaps provide a new perspective that you aren’t seeing. On the flip side, ask yourself what people tend to seek your advice about. Are you the go-to computer expert or sewing master?

Some people find their passion through a strong desire to help others or make a difference. Is there anything you see that makes you so enraged or upset that you feel an irresistible urge to do something to fix it? Some people are not satisfied with donating money or attending rallies, they feel a strong need to dive in and personally do their part to make the world a better place.

Think about any skills that come naturally to you, such as drawing or baking. These might be great jumping-off points for hobbies or even a side hustle. Not all hobbies need to be non-profitable, although that shouldn’t be the motivation. In an ideal world, everybody would get paid for doing the job they are most passionate about.

This article was originally published on michellebeltran.org.

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