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What Lessons I Learned from My Dog

My dog has made me a better person and that is what a non-human companion can do to you. Let me tell you my story, what I’ve learned from Daisy and uncountable stray dogs.

I’ve been raised in a family who admire dogs. But for some acceptable reasons and family’s economic conditions, we never got a dog as a family until my teenage. However, my caring mother always used to feed and have been feeding pariah dogs and provide them makeshift shelters to let them hide in rains and chilly winter nights.

Things got better eventually and finally, we adopted Daisy from a nearby shelter. She is 10 years now and has almost been with us for a decade. My dog has made me a better person and that is what a non-human companion can do to you.

To be a pet parent is a big responsibility and you might not be ready to bring one home. But at some point in your life, you will be capable to do so. Don’t miss that opportunity in your small lifetime. A dog is God 😉 Let me tell you my story, what I’ve learned from Daisy and uncountable stray dogs.


Dogs Give Everybody a Chance


Dogs see all humans equally. When I take Daisy out for a walk, she loves to be petted by everyone in the park. Daisy is quite energetic and loves to socialize with people. She plays fetch and other games with other pet dog friends and dog parents.

While our way back to home, beggars on the street curb greet her and she doesn’t see them differently. When they pet Daisy, she gets happy and greets them as merrily as she would greet other people in the garden. In a nutshell, dogs give everybody a fair chance. They don’t see indifferently and judge them people on their color and their social status.

I accidentally hit my dog on his face when she was misbehaving and scratching at another dog at a park. I regretted afterward for hitting her. But after some time, she was ok and moved on with what I did to her. She was as happy as she was a couple of hours ago. Not seeing people differently based on their social status and color, and race and giving your beloved a chance is what I love most about dogs.

Dogs Adapt and Thrive


I recently adopted a corgi. He was quite unpleasant knowing that he is going to share his pet parent with another canine friend. In the beginning, they didn’t get along well but after a couple of weeks, I saw them playing together and taking a nap in Daisy’s bed.

Tom didn’t like to play or eat with Daisy but now, they do everything together, like a soulmate. Daisy once badly fell ill, and Tom always stayed by her side as her little brother. When both were new to each other, Tom used to growl at her but he adapted the new home and family.
We complain about the things that don’t comfort us. I have learned to accept the inconveniencies and change and to adpat them and grow.

There was a time when I used to train using an invisible fence. I have seen many dogs getting knocked down on the road by speeding cars and die. I know people feel it’s cruel to shock collar train a dog but it’s for safety and I can never compromise with it. Knowing the appropriate use of dog shock collar is ethical and that never means cruelty. There is a proper guide to shock collars for dogs if you’re looking for one. They will adapt the situation no matter what.

Dogs Forgive and Move On

Daisy forgives. I do certain things intentionally and unintentionally to her which she doesn’t like or feel offended by. She deserves an apology. For example, I leave for work (I have to), I pick her out of the trash can where she likes to play, and I don’t play fetch with her when I am ill and not in a mood of doing anything.

She mopes for a while but she will be on my side in no time. I never see the difference in her behavior towards me for all the disliking things I do for her. She has a big heart and so does all the dogs.

Same way, we need to learn that mistakes happen and sometimes you might get offended by your beloved ones. And that taught me to not hold the grudges for anyone and talk to them directly about how I felt when they said that, and trust me, things will get a lot easier.

Be wise, let your emotional intelligence work, and forgive where you can because to forgive easily is a sign of greatness and importantly, move on.

Dogs Enjoy the Journey



Daisy enjoys the ride, no matter where we are heading towards. Whenever I get her along with me in the car she becomes cheerful and doesn’t care if she knows I am getting her to the vet.

She just gets excited that I am taking her with me and doesn’t think about the consequences and possible outcomes. When I am in a dilemma, I wonder, Daisy doesn’t overthink and enjoys the ride and that is actually a good approach because I ought to take a plunge into whatever I’ve got to do without much thinking much about unexpected possibilities of my decisions.

In a nutshell, I have learned that whatever I do, there will be twists and turns in my journey and I have to embrace them as a part of the journey without overreacting and to get started with something shouldn’t be that hard.

Dogs Always Make Some Time for Workout


Daisy is a senior dog now, but I never see even a slight drop in her excitement to get out and play. She knows she is going to have to do exhausting physical activity while playing fetch.

She is always stays excited and when I keep working for the whole day, she initiates the play. She would bring a toy and force me to play with her. Her spirit for playing and going out on a walk every day keeps me motivated to stay physically active and to workout regularly.


Final Thoughts


The greatest benefit of having a non-human companion is you can learn what humans cannot teach you. Daisy and Tom never let me down and teach me many things without being aware of it. I am so grateful for what they have done for me and if you’re a dog parent, you can relate to this post more than anyone. I would also love to know how your pooch is inspiring you. Happy commenting 🙂

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