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What it Really Means to be an Empath in a Dog-Eat-Dog World, and How to Stay Connected at All Times

How the power of an empath can massively impact the world

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In the end, aren't we all in the same boat?
In the end, aren't we all in the same boat?

I believe that love in action heals not only the world but that it also heals our hearts. I have always been an ultra-sensitive, empathic, energy-absorbing human who has suffered tremendously because of all the negativity surrounding me at all times. I grew up in a neglectful environment and because of a complete lack of boundaries, I ended up attracting one narcissist after the other. And, repeat. The typical doormat absorbing everybody’s dirt, always ready for more dirt. I just didn’t know any better.

I am also your atypical highly sensitive person, though. I am the extroverted kind, the type who is always on the lookout for something fun and exciting, no matter what. I’d find myself suffering the abuse of the narcissist or the sociopath over and over, and still, be able to connect to something inside that never left me. It’s something that, I guess, I was blessed to be born with. It’s a light of some sort, a kind of “glow” that I know is connected to all there is. It’s the kind of glow that children possess. It’s the wonderment and awe inspired directly by life itself. It’s an innate curiosity, a joy, call it whatever you want. It’s something that, despite everything, has really helped me not only to stay afloat but to really thrive. And, I believe, it’s something that is inside every single soul of ours. I KNOW that I don’t have to look outside of myself because it has always been with me. 

As an extroverted empath, the biggest challenge was not being able to recognize my boundaries. Where I ended and where the other began. Whenever someone was in trouble, in pain, or in need, I’d drop every single thing that I was doing to completely dedicate myself to that person. And, inevitably, I’d get sucked into their endless drama, not being able to untangle myself from the situation because of my inability to say “no.” Well, while I still occasionally struggle with the fateful two-letter word, I have come a long way since my abusive upbringing and toxic relationships. I now have healthy people in my life and, especially, I have a healthy way of relating to myself. I am able to say no. I am able to detach emotionally when I recognize that I am starting to repeat the same toxic patterns. 

What we empaths truly possess is an amazing gift, and that is our predisposition to put ourselves in someone else’s shoes. Our sensitivities can change the world for the better, and our compassion and understanding are much needed in a world that, because of the Covid pandemic, has pressed the pause button for a while. We can all regroup, as if in a big group of almost eight billion people. We can all do it differently, but we must regroup nonetheless. As empaths, we must recognize our gift. It’s a gift that can bring much joy and love where needed the most. All we need to focus on first is our boundaries and learn that we can be loving and compassionate towards others, without making it become detrimental to ourselves. 

I have always been a curious and empathic person. It is that sensitivity that has led me to travel the world and bring aid wherever I go, be it in the form of raising funds to renovate an entire orphanage in Kenya, a run-down clinic in Malawi, or co-Found an animal sanctuary in Sicily, Italy. I am also a nonprofit photographer who has had the privilege of working with countless organizations around the world. I am a believer that Love in Action heals not only the world but that it also holds the key to our own healing.

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