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Welby Accely: “Realize that tomorrow is another day”

Honestly, it didn’t feel like there was a specific time or place but more of a timeframe in my life where so many around me weren’t living to their full potential. Sure, there were a few who believed in me and knew I would go far, but if I talked about my passions they wouldn’t […]

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Honestly, it didn’t feel like there was a specific time or place but more of a timeframe in my life where so many around me weren’t living to their full potential. Sure, there were a few who believed in me and knew I would go far, but if I talked about my passions they wouldn’t engage in the conversation because they probably thought it wasn’t realistic. It’s hard to think big when the people around you can’t align with the mindset. These were the times when I was both setting up and running other types of businesses in New York (a nursing agency, a car dealership, and tire shop business) before I ultimately wanted to get back into real estate.


As a part of our series about “dreamers who ignored the naysayers and did what others said was impossible”, I had the pleasure of interviewing Welby Accely.

Welby Accely is a Real Estate investor and consultant based in Long Island, NY. In the early days of his career, Welby began managing a number of properties during the subprime mortgage boom of the early 2000s. During this time of extreme change leading up to 2007/2008, Welby was constantly learning about real estate principles and strategies in order to develop himself into a thought leader and professional.

Over the years to follow he has organized multiple large scale seminars for real estate professionals, helping others develop tangible and valuable skills necessary to succeed in the market. While continuing to work on his own real estate investments, in 2020 Welby launched his website and consulting program in Fall 2020 to help work with clients virtually, while informing them of other upcoming events. For more information, visit www.atmybest197.com


Thank you so much for joining us! Our readers would love to ‘get to know you’ a bit better. Can you tell us your ‘backstory’?

I was born and raised in New York, and as a proud first generation Haitian I had a pretty normal childhood but got heavily into the idea of entrepreneurship and the idea of business during my teenage years. One of my first career type gigs was managing properties during the subprime mortgage boom, well before the big crash in 2007–2008. At the time I really attached myself to the idea of being in real estate, and between my job and getting involved in my own real estate projects 2009 rolled around and fell into a hole I couldn’t escape.

It was a lot of trial and error in my first round of real estate, and the crash pulled me in a direction of trying different things like running a nursing agency, car dealership and tire shop business which also fell apart within a period of time. It was like the universe was telling me to get back on the horse, and give this real estate thing another go around. Since I didn’t have a mentor in business, I had to make a lot of huge mistakes to really figure out what works and how to align with my purpose in real estate. I also felt inspired by my godfather as he was the only one in the family who owned real estate and I could see how all the hard work paid off.

I have an obsessive persona with business and habits, so I knew that applying all my wisdom and life lessons will help me help myself as they say.

Are you working on any new or exciting projects now? How do you think that will help people?

Absolutely, I’ve been taking some of my consulting efforts online to schedule select appointments with those seeking more insight and guidance on real estate investing. I still hold seminars on sight at my Connecticut properties, but with the pandemic a lot of people are sticking with seeking knowledge online. I wanted to stay ahead of the curve and make myself available for a nominal fee which gets them one-on-one time to talk about their challenges and goals. This isn’t a coaching program, which is typically monthly or even weekly, but more of a chance to get a hyper-focused chunk of time to get down to the questions that can break down walls. Sometimes those in real estate have most questions figured out, but have a couple key challenges they are looking for expert guidance on, and that’s where I come in.

In your opinion, what do you think makes your company or organization stand out from the crowd?

I think a lot of people getting into real estate seek out books and large scale seminars that give attendees all the feel good stuff. Sure, there’s some knowledge there but it really doesn’t walk you through the process and feel like an educating process. People love my seminars because they take place on-site at the properties I am currently investing in or own, and we get down to business going through each step of the process. I see real estate as not only a business, but also a creative process and many of us are visual people. When you can get thrown in the environment and see things in a ‘real time’ type way, it really gets you thinking and truly motivated.

These consulting calls I’m scheduling are unique as well since a good majority of real estate coaches are doing web seminars or in-person events which may not help your direct issue.

Ok, thank you for that. I’d like to jump to the main focus of this interview. Has there ever been a time that someone told you something was impossible, but you did it anyway? Can you share the story with us? What was your idea? What was the reaction of the naysayers? And how did you overcome that?

Honestly, it didn’t feel like there was a specific time or place but more of a timeframe in my life where so many around me weren’t living to their full potential. Sure, there were a few who believed in me and knew I would go far, but if I talked about my passions they wouldn’t engage in the conversation because they probably thought it wasn’t realistic. It’s hard to think big when the people around you can’t align with the mindset. These were the times when I was both setting up and running other types of businesses in New York (a nursing agency, a car dealership, and tire shop business) before I ultimately wanted to get back into real estate.

It can feel a bit alienating to own your truth and take the hustle on your own, but when I did it was almost instantly that I began meeting others that “got” what I was trying to do and my network grew from there. I think it’s hard for people to take that first step, especially when you’re comfortable doing what you already know. I even had family and a couple friends shocked that I got back into real estate, and perhaps some stayed quiet because they didn’t believe it was possible.

In the end, how were all the naysayers proven wrong? 🙂

Ultimately, many of those who didn’t believe in me aren’t really on my radar these days. Perhaps some came back around and we re-forged our relationships, but I’m not sitting around thinking of the past. I believe those in my life are meant to be there, but only if it’s on positive terms and we have a mutual respect for each other’s presence. I just think some of those past naysayers were just not willing to put in the work themselves so they stayed on the level they knew best.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

I would say it’s been all the people along the way and the clients/students I’ve worked with to force me to always learn and keep an open mind. I always credit my godfather for indirectly inspiring me to want to go big and live my dreams. He was the only one in the family really doing the “real estate” thing and one of the only members to own a home. To me that was massive, and really piqued my interest to learn more about the industry and take my first job in real estate before the crash. I don’t really have that “one person” that lifted me up, but am very thankful for everyone along the way who has had my back.

It must not have been easy to ignore all the naysayers. Did you have any experiences growing up that have contributed to building your resiliency? Can you share the story with us?

Fortunately, I grew up in a modest family setting where hard work had to be done to get what you want. There wasn’t a huge scarcity mindset with any family members, which helped keep a good head on my shoulders and allowed me to pursue entrepreneurship, leadership and goals of wealth without fear of failure. I found that most people just aren’t interested in putting in the work, or taking those calculated risks at their jobs or within their own businesses. Especially right now, one really has to either play it safe or have a lot of fire for crushing it to make it through 2020 and beyond. It’s crazy out there, so I understand why people are cautious these days, but the world is also full of great opportunities in real estate and other industries.

Based on your experience, can you share 5 strategies that people can use to harness the sense of tenacity and do what naysayers think is impossible? (Please share a story or an example for each)

Realize that what people say is a reflection of their upbringing and values, not yours. Whatever advice people give you, is ultimately what THEY would do in the situation. Even if the person dishing the advice is more successful than you, don’t take everything they say as the end all solution.

Realize that most successful people don’t post about their failures, shortcomings and down times. The naysayers likely have failed at what they really want to do in life, and are just projecting those feelings toward you. Do you have a friend that rags on respected people like Elon Musk or Tyler Perry? They may say they will fail at some point or that their products and dreams are terrible or that they won’t work long term. That’s just more projection of fear just based on their own opinions, and believe me there are people in your network that may think the same of you. It may feel like you’re on your own sometimes, but if you’re in it to win just accept that it’s sometimes part of the deal.

Realize that most people have no idea how entrepreneurship, leadership and true freedom works. It may not be fear, but more the comfort that most people accept in business. That’s totally fine by the way, but if you have the itch to move up the ladder or even go on your own, some may not like it and even your boss, friends, spouse and other potential competitors may be naysayers. Believe me, the first step is the hardest and with some continued education and calculated risks, you’ll never look back. Let’s make those naysayers into believers, right?

Realize that tomorrow is another day. You will have days that you will want to quit, go back on Indeed to find another job and tell yourself you’ll try again another time. That “another time” may never come, but if you keep pushing it may take a short amount of time to fully recover from whatever knocked you down.

Realize that what you try may not be your final business or entrepreneurial path. I had 3 other businesses, multiple jobs and was in real estate prior to having my current position. Always be calculated and intentional with your ideas, and know it’s better to try something out then to look back in regret for never trying.

What is your favorite quote or personal philosophy that relates to the concept of resilience?

“Every morning we are born again. What we do today is what matters most.” — Buddha

A quote like this reminds me to live in the moment, cause we may not have a tomorrow and whatever happened yesterday is in the past. If you have a great idea, start today. If you feel doubted by others on living your dream, today is the day to ignore that and try anyway. Believe me, most people are not sitting around wondering what we are up to or doing. That’s actually a selfish way of thinking, and we are actually the biggest barrier to our own success.

You are a person of great influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good for the greatest number of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger.

I would want to start a movement that inspires people to learn more about real estate and investing in themselves. We can’t crutch on the basics like social security and a 401K. Both are important to have, but without real estate many people will grow older and realize those basics won’t support them. It’s better to live a full life now, and real estate can help make dreams real and create wealth while you are young enough to 110% enjoy it.

Can our readers follow you on social media?

https://www.instagram.com/atmybest197
https://www.atmybest197.com/

Thank you for these great stories. We wish you only continued success!

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