Community//

We are all different, that’s beautiful

When kids live and grow globally, they learn to respect every culture no matter how different they are from theirs.

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Life has given me opportunities and experiences beyond measures. Times when I look back, I find myself fortunate to count on the blessings I have been bestowed upon. Even when days didn’t seem right, I figured out the end and felt contented that it’s over. Most days brought so many pleasant surprises that I was filled with gratitude for the splendid journey we had covered measure by measure. It’s been an enriching experience moving around the world and at the same time nurturing my own culture in every tiny way I can to keep our roots intact.

when I think of my children, they are exceedingly privileged and lucky indeed. They have a beautiful home, a loving family, kind friends and encouraging teachers. They have lived and accepted multicultural environment at a very early age. Living a multi faceted life has given them a more wider and liberal understanding of the world. The expanse of their intellect at this age sometimes amuses me. In an unconscious manner they have incorporated the feeling of oneness. And they feel they belong to all.

My older son, who is 7 misses his Norwegian friend and wishes to see him again. He also sometimes talks fondly about his Indian friend in Kazakhstan and plans to Skype call to tell him stories of Nigeria,where he lives now. How gratifying inspite of he realising the fact that he will never grow up seeing some of his dear friends who he met in his previous lived locations, he still cares enough to stay in touch. He still has the willingness and enthusiasm to build strong friendship in his present place of residence.

He doesn’t fear…..he believes in the value of friendship regardless of the distance and geographical boundaries. He cherishes and talks about little anecdotes that he still remembers vividly. The bicycle rounds he took endlessly with his friend in Kazakhstan.The visit to the pirate boat with his friend in Oslo and how he fought hard with other Norwegian kids with his balloon sword. The sharing of his favourite gummies with only his best friend on a Sunday morning. And the never to be missed play dates with his friend in India are just some that I remember him telling me about at many occasions.

The other day when my son narrated me the story of his snack time in school- he didn’t question why the Nigerians ate different from us. He knows that we are different. Our eating habits and our taste buds are not alike. However, he clarified to me that they also eat rice just like we do and our Maggi looks similar to their Indomine. Doesn’t that shows, how he notices the commonality than the differences?

Although the phase of this multi-diverse and varying life may end sooner or later, it will be a rewarding one. And quiet possible our children might choose to settle in a monocultural environment when they grow. Nevertheless the memories will remain throughout their life in the form of pictures, videos and journals. And not to mention, certainly reflect in their personality .These diminutive to enormous souvenirs of memories my children have gathered from their idyllic past will bring immense happiness and enrichment into their dynamic future life.

There is a wonderful Sanskrit phrase- “I can see myself in all things and all the people around me”.

This is the best way to summarize my globe-trotters.

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