WarhorseUSA-A Majestic Symbol of Freedom and How You Can Help

“YOU OCCASIONALLY SEE ONE, AND IT’S THE THRILL OF A LIFETIME. BUT MOSTLY ALL YOU EVER SEE IS A CLOUD OF DUST AFTER THEY ARE GONE. IT’S THEIR STUBBORN ABILITY TO SURVIVE THAT MAKES THEM SO REMARKABLE.” — Velma “Wild Horse Annie” Johnston

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Wild Mustangs and burros are beautiful and majestic creatures who have become a symbol for freedom across the United States. Wild horses and burros reside in the 10 beautiful Western states of Nevada, Wyoming, Utah, Oregon, California, Idaho, Arizona, Montana, North Dakota and New Mexico.  These incredible animals roam about 27 million acres of land throughout the U.S. Because of the vast number of wild horses, (48,000 residing in holding facilities and 82,000 residing on private ranches, Native American reservations, federal land, in wildlife refuges and sanctuaries), it has become extremely difficult to fund the proper care of these animals. 

The United States began working to protect wild horses in the late 1960s and early ‘70s. Mustangs and burros weren’t covered by the Endangered Species Act, as they’re not considered native to the Americas, so another law needed to be made to protect them. In 1971, a federal law was created that banned capturing, harming or killing free-roaming horses or Burros on public land. The Bureau of Land Management is now responsible for the care and management of wild horse herds that reside on federal land. Unfortunately, The Bureau of Land Management does not currently have the funding to sustain the number of horses that they must care for. 

Jessica Jordaan saw this struggle and made it her mission to make a difference for this cause. A love for horses from a very young age and her background growing up in Cody, Wyoming motivated Jessica to start a non-profit organization called WARHORSEUSA. WARHORSEUSA is dedicated to raising awareness around the cause for America’s wild and domesticated Mustangs. 

This organization has made a difference by providing resources such as herd documentation, fertility control, special range projects and promotion of the land and wild horses. The organization also assists by providing community education, outreach, tours, field trips, overnight retreat programs, therapeutic programs and clinics that adults and children can participate in. Education is a key component to solving this issue. Many people are not aware of the endangerment of these animals and with proper education, they can help make a difference too!

WARHORSEUSA is able to provide resources through generous donations from the caring public.  The community helping to share information and spread the word about WARHORSEUSA has also been a great contributing factor to making a difference in this cause. Educating your friends and family about the cause and how they can help is a wonderful way to contribute. 

To learn more about WARHORSEUSA and support their mission, visit https://warhorseusa.org/. To stay up to date on WARHORSE and Jessica Jordaan through picture and video, you can follow them on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/warhorseusa/. This account features lots of personal content as well as content relating to WARHORSEUSA. 

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