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Want To Have Fans? Don’t Get Stuck Between These Two Extremes…

In his self-help book, 50 Cent explained how the success of his first two rap albums made many of his fans stop liking him.  Rap fans liked flawed artists, 50 explained. When he debuted, he was as flawed as it gets: from the streets, never knowing his father, mother murdered when he was eight, multiple-gunshot survivor, on his “last […]

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Want To Have Fans? Don’t Get Stuck Between These Two Extremes… Dre Baldwin DreAllDay.com

In his self-help book, 50 Cent explained how the success of his first two rap albums made many of his fans stop liking him. 

Rap fans liked flawed artists, 50 explained. When he debuted, he was as flawed as it gets: from the streets, never knowing his father, mother murdered when he was eight, multiple-gunshot survivor, on his “last chance” in life

After selling all those albums (over 20 millions between the first two releases), 50’s flaws weren’t so visible anymore. He had actually made it, and didn’t have as much in common anymore with the struggling peasants who’d originally supported his music. 

This lost connection to the audience is what 50 attributed to his decline in album sales and diminishing star as a rap artist. 

I don’t know if that lost connection is fully responsible for 50’s lost popularity, but the concept makes sense. I thought of something similar recently when watching a YouTube video of two “influencers” playing a one-on-one game of basketball

Now, neither of these guys I was watching could actually play (read: perform in a game at the college or pro level). But they both had a ton of fans supporting them and their basketball skills. In browsing through the comments, it dawned on me: a lot of the commentators could relate to these YouTubers because playing ball on YouTube was, for both the video creators and the commentators, likely the ceiling on their playing careers

Viewers could relate to and see themselves in the creators. 

The moral: People want to see you in one of two ways. 

Be similar enough to them (or at least appear to be) that people can see themselves in you. 

Or…

Be so far above them that people see you as a superpower that, though they can’t be you, they can live vicariously through you. Be similar enough to them (or at least appear to be) that people can see themselves in you. Or…Be so far above them that people see you as a superpower that, though they can’t be you, they can live vicariously through you. CLICK TO TWEET

A caveat: whichever one you are, you have to stay that way. 

Don’t be common and then become a star. 

Don’t be a star and try to pretend to be just like everyone else. 

People will reject both. 

What this means to you: people will accept you however you choose to present yourself — but you need to be sure about what that presentation is gonna be. What this means to you: people will accept you however you choose to present yourself — but you need to be sure about what that presentation is gonna be. CLICK TO TWEET

Your next step will be to read my book The Super You, on Unlocking And Living With Your Highest Level Of Confidence. It’s part of the Bulletproof Bundle, which you can get the best deal on by checking the box on this page: http://MirrorOfMotivation.com 

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