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Vaishali Nikhade of ‘The Uncanny Link Podcast’: “

Solve a problem in its infancy — When I was leading a project while working in the engineering world, one of my managers once told me, it’s best to solve a problem when it’s very young and nip it in the bud. Otherwise, it becomes a big issue. One person in the project wasn’t working out. So, I […]

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Solve a problem in its infancy — When I was leading a project while working in the engineering world, one of my managers once told me, it’s best to solve a problem when it’s very young and nip it in the bud. Otherwise, it becomes a big issue.

One person in the project wasn’t working out. So, I went and discussed the situation with my manager. In a very neat manner, we let him finish his current portion of the work and moved him on to a different project.


As a part of our series about women who are shaking things up in their industry, I had the pleasure of interviewing Vaishali Nikhade.

Vaishali is the host of the podcast ‘The Uncanny Link’ where physics meets metaphysics or science meets woo.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Before we dig in, our readers would like to get to know you a bit more. Can you tell us a bit about your “backstory”? What led you to this particular career path?

Looking back at where I am today, the seeds were sown a long time back when I was a kid. Growing up in India, my grandmother would have an astrologer who would visit her once a year from a different part of the country. And just watching him do the predictions was a little bit fascinating.

So think about young kids. And you’re presenting to them an idea that ‘Oh, the future can be seen.’ So something in my young mind must have grasped a great amount of fascination about it. But it was just left there.

I went to school and studied engineering and ended up working in Northern and Southern California to design computer chips. And after working in the high tech industry, at one point, I decided to change my career path. And I was seeking help by calling up psychics. And after calling about somewhere in the vicinity of 30, to 50 psychics, I threw my hands up in the air and said, ‘Oh, my God, these people have no idea what they’re talking about. I need to figure this out myself.’

And this is where I started the journey of trying to figure out if this thing called ‘predicting the future’ is even real. And this is what led me to study metaphysics, and to study how psychic readings work, and whether or not the future can be predicted. Or whether there is any truth in it.

And coming from a scientific background, I experimented scientifically. I took small samples of time and tested the readings to verify if they would play out. Fascinatingly enough, I discovered that ‘time is transparent’ and you can peek into it. And one thing led to another, and here I am. So today, I am a business psychic, and I can peek into the future of a business and predict what is going to happen. And I talk about it on my podcast, The Uncanny Link, where physics meets metaphysics.

In today’s parlance, being disruptive is usually a positive adjective. But is disrupting always good? When do we say the converse, that a system or structure has ‘withstood the test of time’? Can you articulate to our readers when disrupting an industry is positive, and when disrupting an industry is ‘not so positive’? Can you share some examples of what you mean?

Every industry needs to be disrupted, or else it will suffer from stagnation.

Think about the days before Google. Google was actually the disrupter in terms of being an internet search engine. Think about the days before social media; Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, pinterest; all these have been disruptors in their own way to be able to bring out what is today known as social media.

Think about pre COVID, COVID was the disrupter. Essentially, it changed the way things work or it kind of broke a logical pattern of how things were working. People had to think and change things or change the way they were doing things.

So more than anything, disruption helps us evolve. It helps us think differently, and it helps us make the choices that are not so logical. Most of the times, things only go linearly for so long. There is usually some sort of a disruption, the magnitude varies. So, for the sake of evolution, disruption is extremely good.

Disrupting an industry can also be ‘not so positive’ at times. Most of the times, when it happens, usually, it is the time to get in the market that is off. For instance, think about a gym trying to innovate in 2019. They draw up all their plans and start working on the plan of action to implement it. Their projections state that by March of 2020, everything will be ready to go.

Unfortunately, Covid hit and shut down all the gyms. So, in this case, no matter how disruptive their strategy, implementation and plan was, their disruptive approach missed timing. You can also read the answer to my favorite quote in one of the following questions to see why the hand of Divine is definitely affecting this particular situation.

Can you share 3 of the best words of advice you’ve gotten along your journey? Please give a story or example for each.

1. Solving a problem in its infancy

When I was leading a project while working in the engineering world, one of my managers once told me, it’s best to solve a problem when it’s very young and nip it in the bud. Otherwise, it becomes a big issue.

One person in the project wasn’t working out. So, I went and discussed the situation with my manager. In a very neat manner, we let him finish his current portion of the work and moved him on to a different project.

2. When you point a finger at someone, you are pointing four fingers towards yourself

I received this email neatly laid out with around ten points pointing fingers at me. Every finger that was pointed to me, I could only see the four fingers they were pointing to themself. So, how do you respond to such a scenario ?

Speech is silver, silence is golden — in other words, when you can’t say anything good, then don’t say anything at all.

3. Trust your intuition

Because our gut instincts or intuition is more futuristic, it is hard to believe what it’s saying. The only reason is that our reference is in present time. Most of the times, it is possible to trace our gut instincts as having the information and conveying it to us what we needed to know.

Think back to when September 11th happened. There were some people who missed their flight from Boston airport, or didn’t go to work on time because they didn’t feel well. What they were doing is trusting their gut instincts to avoid boarding the flight or going to work — which ended up saving them their life.

I also discuss a lot of real life scenarios and examples related to intuition in my podcast…

In your opinion, what are the biggest challenges faced by ‘women disruptors’ that aren’t typically faced by their male counterparts?

One of the challenges that is faced by women disruptors is partly it is lack of trust, especially if you are the only one, as an inventor coming up with something.

Because the impression you get from the other side is like ‘no one has been able to figure this out until now, how come you are able to do it?’

I’m not sure if I were a guy, I would get the same kind of reaction. Having said that, I do think that things are changing or evolving.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

This is the translation of the quote from my mother tongue, ‘Marathi’ into English — it is the closest translation I can get; effectively, it means:

Even if you have the potential of a go-getter,

Whatever you do, it has power,

But unless the Divine is willing,

Nothing will come out of it

How can our readers follow you online?

https://linkedin.com/in/vaishalinikhadehttps://facebook.com/theuncannylinkhttps://twitter.com/theuncannylinkhttps://instagram.com/theuncannylink

This was very inspiring. Thank you so much for joining us!

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