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Up Leveling You and Your Team’s Development

When I left my full time corporate job in IT many years ago, I had no idea what I was going to do next. I just knew it wasn’t what I always did before. When I reflected on what I loved doing in my Corporate work, I enjoyed developing my people and in doing so, […]

When I left my full time corporate job in IT many years ago, I had no idea what I was going to do next. I just knew it wasn’t what I always did before. When I reflected on what I loved doing in my Corporate work, I enjoyed developing my people and in doing so, developing myself. Therefore, I stepped into my work as a leadership coach. And here I am in the same fulfilling profession of developing people into better leaders. 

As part of my own development, I study with experts. I am currently studying how to up level my work under two amazing leaders in the coaching industry, David Peterson, Director of Executive Coaching & Leadership at Google LLC and David Goldsmith, a coaching industry pioneer and Executive Director of 7 Paths Forward LLC.

Working with both Davids, I learned a very useful tool I use in my work with my clients called The Development Pipeline (Peterson, 2006). It helps me determine where a client is with a particular issue. As I reflected on the impact of this particular model, I thought how useful this would have been in my corporate leadership to understand where my team members were on this pipeline and how we could best determine what they needed to focus on in their development. 

There are five elements in The Development Pipeline:

As you read the descriptions of each element, think of a specific development need either you or one of your team members is having and think about where you should focus your attention. 

  1. Insight: The extent to which the person understands what areas need to be developed in order to be more effective.
  2. Motivation: The degree to which the person is willing to invest the time and energy it takes to develop oneself. 
  3. Capabilities: The extent to which the person has the skills and knowledge that are needed. 
  4. Real-world practice: The extent to which the person has opportunities to try new skills at work. 
  5. Accountability: The extent to which there are internal and external mechanisms for paying attention to change and providing meaningful consequences. 

Which element do you utilize for the sake of development? 

What is one action you will take to move your development forward?

Written by Pat Obuchowski

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