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TY Falcoa: “Don’t try to be perfect”

Don’t try to be perfect. — I am an extreme perfectionist. I’ve always been. However, there is never going to be this “perfection” that exists when it comes to creating art. I would constantly change aspects of my songs and spend way too much time on them while simultaneously trying to release them. That created a lot […]

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Don’t try to be perfect. — I am an extreme perfectionist. I’ve always been. However, there is never going to be this “perfection” that exists when it comes to creating art. I would constantly change aspects of my songs and spend way too much time on them while simultaneously trying to release them. That created a lot of stress for me and I didn’t enjoy creating as much as I once did. Once I took a step back and realized that I was creating something from nothing, the creative process flowed much easier for me. I was creating a song that wasn’t here before I came along. That is very inspiring to me, and it helps me create without so much pressure.


As a part of our series about rising music stars, I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing TY Falcoa.

You may recognize his unique voice from renowned brother Pop duo ‘Tyler & Ryan’, who have made their mark in the music industry and online streaming world, surpassing 20 million YouTube views, and millions of streams on their original music. Now, TY has entered into a new stage in his career. After years of being captivated by 80’s music, the 26-year-old from Rhode Island is coming into his own, marrying catchy string-bending riffs with emotional heart bending lyrics as he brings his listeners back to a time of emotional, real, and organic music. With his 80’s inspired sounds and modern producing techniques, you’re bound to be hooked. From his bedroom to your ears, this is TY Falcoa.https://content.thriveglobal.com/media/e3f678233aad8ae773c882a14f5fb4d3


Thank you so much for doing this with us TY! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

Thank you for having me! I grew up in a small town called Bristol, Rhode Island. It’s a quiet place with not too much going on. Growing up into a Portuguese/Italian family dynamic, I was and still am very close with my family. Both my parents encouraged my brother Ryan and I to choose our paths in life and that set the direction for the life I now have. I played sports as a young child up until the age of 12 or 13 until my love for music overcame my love for sports.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

As a sports lover, one of the very first sports I played was Football. I started at the age of 6 and played until I was 11. However, I got injured at the age of 10 during a practice scrimmage against my own team. One of my teammates had the habit of tackling with his head down (which you’re not supposed to do as it can seriously injure your neck and/or another player). As I was running the ball, my teammate playing on defense tackled me with his head down. Back in that time, we used metal chin-strap clips that attached to the helmet so that our chinstraps wouldn’t fall off while playing. The metal clip itself severed my left bicep open, down to the muscle resulting in 115 stitches inside and out. I was out for the season and so my Dad brought home a guitar to help me pass the time while I couldn’t play Football. That was the beginning of a great journey for me.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

The most interesting story that happened since I began my career was absolutely life changing. I played in a Pop duo with my brother Ryan for many years and we still play and release music together today! We had the opportunity to open up for Ingrid Michaelson, Shaggy and One Republic up in Boston, Massachusetts for over 50,000 people in 2016. It was for a festival concert that Mix 104.1 was hosting! The adrenaline that coursed through us was unforgettable, and all we had was a guitar and both of our voices. The coolest thing was that we were able to hang out with Shaggy before heading out on stage. Forever life changing!

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

The funniest mistake I made when I first started was getting the lyrics wrong when performing. I would make up words throughout the songs we performed simply because I didn’t put as much effort into the words as I did into the harmonies. One of my favorite songs by The Beatles is Come Together. The lyric I was supposed to sing was “Got to be good looking ’cause he’s so hard to see” and instead I sang, “Got to be good looking ’cause he looks just like me”! It just came out without even thinking but it was funny and the crowd got some amusement out of it. The best lesson to learn is get to know all aspects of the song, not just certain pieces.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

I’m very excited to be working on an EP that I have coming out in 2021. Those songs are very real and they hit home for me, both stylistically and lyrically. I think 2020 has been a very reflective year for a lot of people and 2021 is going to be the year that lots of reflective music will come out as a result of that. I also have been producing and engineering records for a lot of my friends lately so I’m excited to be a part of that for them and to also showcase some collabs that came out of those projects along the way!

We are very interested in diversity in the entertainment industry. Can you share three reasons with our readers about why you think it’s important to have diversity represented in film and television? How can that potentially affect our culture?

Diversity is very important in any industry but especially important in the entertainment industry because the entertainment industry has a worldwide audience watching, connecting and sharing their content. Entertainment is created by all walks of life for all walks of life and that message needs to be consistent and showcased. The three main reasons why we need diversity is to connect with all different types of people, to gather different perspectives in the art that is created, and to push boundaries so that we continue to evolve the entertainment industry. Those reasons are extremely important because culture affects art and vice versa. As artists, we hold a mirror up to society when we create and that mirror can either inspire or push away. We need to inspire, because that’s how we move forward together.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

1. Don’t try to be perfect. — I am an extreme perfectionist. I’ve always been. However, there is never going to be this “perfection” that exists when it comes to creating art. I would constantly change aspects of my songs and spend way too much time on them while simultaneously trying to release them. That created a lot of stress for me and I didn’t enjoy creating as much as I once did. Once I took a step back and realized that I was creating something from nothing, the creative process flowed much easier for me. I was creating a song that wasn’t here before I came along. That is very inspiring to me, and it helps me create without so much pressure.

2. Be patient. — I always thought that I needed to attain a certain goal or achieve fame by a certain age. I was always rushing! I’m 26 years old now and I feel like a baby. I have the rest of my life to continue to create, inspire and achieve and I’m so excited and grateful to continue doing so. It’s not about the destination, it’s about the journey so enjoy it and be patient.

3. You have people in your future who are waiting to fall in love with you. — Think back to when you were 10 years old. You couldn’t ever imagine all the people you were about to meet in the coming years. Look at your life now! You still can’t imagine the people you’re about to meet and how they will affect you and vice versa. I spent so much time worrying about being liked that I hadn’t yet realized that there are people who are going to fall in love with me. There are people who I’m going to fall in love with. The mind can’t even imagine how wonderful our futures can be. I had to learn to step outside of my thoughts and fears and just trust that there is so much waiting for me in my future. For all of us.

4. Keep asking yourself why you create. — The answer may change over time. However, I make it a part of my routine to check back in with myself as an artist and ask why it is that I do what I do. Whenever I feel like my answer isn’t genuine or pure then I realize I need to change some things in my perspective.

5. You don’t need a plan B — You have one life, no matter what the circumstance is, if it is important to you then you will make it happen. We all have the same amount of hours in our day. What matters is how we use those hours and we always have a choice. No matter how hard the choice may be, it’s still a choice. I had many people telling me to have a backup plan growing up. I didn’t listen because I knew that any energy I put towards my plan B, was energy being taken away from my plan A. Many may disagree with me, however that mindset worked for me and my life and I believe it holds true to anyone who sticks by that.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

It’s just as important to take personal time as it is to create. This is a long-term game we’re in. If we want to still be creating at 70 years old, then we should probably take care of ourselves along the way. If all you do is create, then you won’t have as much stimuli coming from life itself to help drive that creativity. So never feel bad about stepping away for a bit. Make it a part of your daily routine!

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

Well firstly, thank you so much for that enormous compliment! Secondly, I believe everyone should have basic human rights no matter who they are or where they come from. I know my generation is already moving in that direction when it comes to breaking down barriers, kicking out racism and sexism, providing medicare for all and equal marriage rights for all. I just want to see us continue in that direction because we should not have a homeless issue here in America (or anywhere for that matter), there is plenty to go around. We should not have people dying because they can’t afford to receive medical care. We should not have people afraid of our justice system if they are doing nothing wrong. We should not have people who are afraid to voice WHO they love and share that exciting feeling. I believe in human rights and I believe it’s extremely important to voice that as much as I can, to help others feel like it’s more than okay to do the same. This movement would provide the most amount of love for all. Even for those who disagree.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

Both of my parents have been extremely instrumental in who I am and where I have been. My Dad always told me “no man is an island” and those words constantly echo in my mind. My Dad was the one who introduced me to all the music I know and love. Everything from Chuck Berry to Frank Sinatra, The Beatles to Prince, Van Halen to Heart and everything in-between. Without that enormous influence I would not have the ability to produce for myself nor produce for other artists of all genres. I would not have the ear or the writing ability that I use everyday in every creative scenario. Of course without my Mom keeping Dad in line, it would have been very hard for him to direct the line I walked as a young child. Haha!

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

One of my favorite quotes of all time was said by Steve Jobs. He stated, “…while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius, because the people who are crazy enough to think that they can change the world, are the ones who do.”! I live by this quote everyday and have lived by it since I was in high school when I dreamt of what it’d be like to start the career I’m currently building. I’ve always wanted to have an impact on the world, but the key behind that enormous endeavor is that the world around you becomes impacted when you decide to have an impact on yourself.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

I would love to have a private meal with Neil deGrasse Tyson. Besides me being enamored with Astronomy and Astrophysics, Neil seems like someone who can have a conversation with you about everything and anything and I connect to that. I’ve read a couple of his books like Astrophysics for People in a Hurry and Letters from an Astrophysicist. While both books cultivated my infinitesimally small knowledge of the Cosmos, I was even more captivated by the way in which Neil thinks. I would pick his brain about life, the keys behind success and failure, and of course the Cosmos.

How can our readers follow you online?

You can follow me on Instagram and Twitter (@TylerFalcoa) and on Facebook (@OfficialTylerFalcoa)! My Spotify and Apple Music are found under TY Falcoa!

This was very meaningful, thank you so much! We wish you continued success!

Thank you so much for having me!

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