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TROY: “Don’t just think it, do it!”

…Yeah, I accidentally stalked Brett Eldredge. Haha. I was hanging out with a friend one night down in Printers Alley before covid. I started talking to this guy who unbeknownst to me was hanging with Brett. He asked if I wanted to join them at the next place they were going to. I said “sure.” […]

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…Yeah, I accidentally stalked Brett Eldredge. Haha. I was hanging out with a friend one night down in Printers Alley before covid. I started talking to this guy who unbeknownst to me was hanging with Brett. He asked if I wanted to join them at the next place they were going to. I said “sure.” As I started heading out the door with them, a security guard stopped me — my hanging out with them lasted for 20 feet to the door.


As a part of our series about Nashville’s rising stars, I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing Troy Doherty.

Born in New Jersey, TROY got his start in New York City musical theatre at age 12, acting and singing in the musicals Oliver! (as the Artful Dodger) and in the world premiere of A Christmas Story (as Skut Farkus). Garnering attention from the New York Times, TROY eventually moved to Los Angeles where his talents landed him roles on-screen in the TV shows This Is Us (NBC) as John Smiley, The Last Ship (TNT) as Clayton Swain, and Victorious (Nickelodeon) as the Hambone King.

Performing has always been a part of TROY’s life — and music has always been his driving passion. Following his passion, in 2019 TROY relocated to Nashville to work with Producer Marti Frederiksen (Aerosmith, Carrie Underwood, Daughtry) at Sienna Studios who produced TROY’s first three singles, Unbreakable, Undercover and Foolish. “I’ve worked with some of the top artists in the industry, and TROY’s right on track to being on that list” said Frederiksen.

TROY is also working closely with his music manager Michael Keeling (production/creative design work on Cold Play’s “Speed of Sound”, No Doubt’s “Tragic Kingdom” and Kacey Musgraves “Follow Your Arrow”). TROY’s in production of his debut EP which is scheduled to release in June of 2021.https://content.thriveglobal.com/media/5e4e28dbe33749f2b7b87bcff03019f8


Thank you so much for joining us in this series! Our readers would love to get to know you a bit better. Can you tell us a bit of the ‘backstory’ of how you grew up?

I’m happy to. I was born in New Jersey, and grew up at the Jersey Shore. I love the beach. Apparently, I started singing pretty much the minute I could speak. When I was 12, I started performing in musical theater in New York. I moved to LA when I was 15 and was fortunate to work in the acting industry (This is Us, The Last Ship, Victorious…) while writing music. Performing has always been a part of my life but music has always been my driving passion.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

I grew up in a household where music was always being played — it’s always surrounded me. My parents told me as a kid I’d stand on the table and belt Lou Bega’s Mambo #5 just for the fun of it. But as I got older, and with the support of my parents and many other influential people in my life, I was told I had a powerful voice. So, when I was 12, I got involved with musical theatre in New York City and started writing my own music at age 14.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

I had been playing shows prior to Covid and then when it hit, I was unsure of what to do. I decided to get out of my house and start playing music to my empty cul-de-sac. What started out as a show to nobody turned into a bi-monthly cul-de-sac concert series that lasted throughout Covid. I did over 20 shows eventually playing to hundreds of socially distanced neighbors every week. It was amazing.

Can you share with us an interesting story about living in Nashville?

Yeah, I accidentally stalked Brett Eldredge. Haha. I was hanging out with a friend one night down in Printers Alley before covid. I started talking to this guy who unbeknownst to me was hanging with Brett. He asked if I wanted to join them at the next place they were going to. I said “sure.” As I started heading out the door with them, a security guard stopped me — my hanging out with them lasted for 20 feet to the door.

Can you share with us a few of the best parts of living in Nashville? We’d love to hear some specific examples or stories about that.

I love the greenery. It reminds me of Jersey. I also love the people here. They’ve all been amazing to me since I’ve been here. The overall vibe and energy of Nashville is infectious. Since being here I’ve been able to take my music game to an entirely new level. There’s just something magical about all the music legends that have come through this town that inspires me.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

Well, I didn’t find this funny at the time, but looking back on it, it was really quite comical. I believe I was in Playa del Carmen, Mexico recording a music video as a kid. We were in a natural jungle area. I lifted a leaf with my finger and accidentally poked a hole in the leaf. The guy who was sponsoring the event was not happy with me. He said something like I’ll never make it in this industry if I don’t behave. I was 12, starving and in a jungle. The lesson I learned was to make sure I always have a full belly prior to performing.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

You are so right. It totally takes a village. I have so many people to be grateful for but mostly my parents who have supported me from the start. They’re the best!

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

Oooh, so much is happening. I’m in the middle of editing the Foolish video, which will be out soon. I’m in the final production stage of my EP set to release in June 2021. I can’t wait for everyone to hear it. I’m also performing more and more live shows, including my Cul de Sac concerts in Franklin TN.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

  1. Focus on the craft not the success.
  2. Never skip leg day. You’re going to be on your feet as a performer.
  3. Don’t let your emotions get in the way of making something good.
  4. Eat well. You’ll fit into the tight jeans better.
  5. Don’t just think it, do it!

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

This business is a journey, and it takes both strength and stamina literally and figuratively. I’m a firm believer in working out, meditating and praying, eating well and having a good coach by your side.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

The “We’re Doing It” movement. I believe people just need to get moving to start doing. A body in motion stays in motion.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

I have a bunch, but one that’s resonating with me lately is, from Zig Ziglar. He said, “What you get by achieving your goals is not as important as what you become by achieving your goals.” I’ve sacrificed a lot to achieve my goals and while it would be easy to focus on the sacrifice, I’d rather focus on what I’ve gained as a person.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

I’m a big fan of Andy Grammer. I admire his talent and work ethic. I feel like I could learn a lot from him.

How can our readers follow you online?

You guys can find me at www.troydoherty.com and my socials including Instagram, TikTok and Twitter @troydoherty and Facebook: @TroyDohertyOfficial.

This was very meaningful, thank you so much! We wish you continued success!

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