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Too Lost changing the music industry for independent artists

Your next single can change the world, it can excite some people, or it can go completely unnoticed. You compose a song or discover a song; the song moves you, and you want to move the world. But in today’s entertainment industry, recording and publishing music for independent artists is too expensive. This makes the […]

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Your next single can change the world, it can excite some people, or it can go completely unnoticed. You compose a song or discover a song; the song moves you, and you want to move the world. But in today’s entertainment industry, recording and publishing music for independent artists is too expensive. This makes the artist step out of their financial boundaries, take a high risk, give away copyrights and master recordings, or sometimes give up on their dreams. Keeping all this in mind, a new music distribution company, Too Lost, is changing the business model that extends the music market’s ways and gives excellent marketing tools and other brand-building services to the artists.

Too Lost is a digital music distributor for independent artists and labels, Founded in New York City. It was founded by local publishers and distributors who believe that some of the most prominent music organizations damage independent artists under their wing.

“We are passionate about the independent music scene and the amazing work that comes from that sector. We were disheartened to see how so many incredible musicians were signing away rights to their music, paying way too much for limited distribution and even giving away a share of their earnings to get their songs out there,” said Gregory Hirschhorn, CEO, Too Lost. “We decided to put our digital expertise and industry relationships to work to give these musicians and labels access to affordable distribution with services to help them grow their brand.”

Too Lost provides instant unlimited distribution by working with the world’s most extensive music services, giving them 100% royalty earnings to their customers with complete transparency in music performance data. Artists pay just $ 2.99 a month or $ 19.99 a year – in total.

This service package is a complete solution that provides independent artists labels on the leg of traditional music, including playlists, anti-robbery software, pre-funding, music publishing services, and song licenses. Artists can also set up a payment split to automatically pay managers, producers, and other participants.

Too Lost offers access to more than 250 music stores and streaming services, including Spotify, Apple Music, Tidal, Amazon, Shazam, TikTok, and more worldwide to reach 200 locations worldwide and music markets emerging countries such as Asia, South Africa, and South America.

“Too Lost is highly efficient and enhances the use of machine learning technology to empower the services we provide and make them work more efficiently,” added Hirschhorn. “We want to empower independent artists and labels to run their businesses according to their terms.”

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