Community//

Three Tips to Improve Student Sleep

Sleep is an essential ingredient to ensure student success. Therefore, it’s important families incorporate healthy sleep into daily routines. According to a survey from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), 57% of parents say their school-age children are not getting enough sleep on school nights. To blame? Ninety percent of parents say that homework […]

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres. We publish pieces written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team, and though they are reviewed for adherence to our guidelines, they are submitted in their final form to our open platform. Learn more or join us as a community member!

Sleep is an essential ingredient to ensure student success. Therefore, it’s important families incorporate healthy sleep into daily routines.

According to a survey from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM), 57% of parents say their school-age children are not getting enough sleep on school nights. To blame? Ninety percent of parents say that homework and early school start times impact students’ ability to get enough sleep, followed by time with friends (87%), social media/electronics use (86%), hobbies (86%), sports (85%), chores/job (83%) and band/music/clubs (78%).

The benefits of healthy sleep require not only adequate sleep duration, but also appropriate timing, daily regularity, good sleep quality and the absence of sleep disorders. Below are some helpful tips to help students improve their sleep, so they are well-rested to tackle their schoolwork and other activities.

1. Set a bedtime to prioritize sleep

For optimal health, daytime alertness and school performance, the AASM recommends that children 6-12 years of age sleep nine to 12 hours each night, and teenagers 13-18 years of age sleep eight to 10 hours each night. Getting the proper amount of sleep is key for students to prepare for academic success and improve personal health and well-being.

In addition, 94% of parents acknowledge that sleep affects their children’s mood, followed by performance in school (93%), physical health (92%), mental health (90%) and performance in sports or other activities (90%).

Things that are learned during the school day are absorbed and retained more efficiently when the recommended hours of sleep are achieved. When students are well-rested, they are more likely to get better grades in school and have a positive attitude toward life. Plus, they enjoy improved attention, emotional regulation, quality of life and physical health. A tired student is more prone to attention, behavioral and learning challenges. Helping children understand that sleep is an essential part of a healthy lifestyle is important for their future, as poor sleep can increase the risk of physical health problems throughout a child’s life. These include obesity, heart disease and diabetes.

2. Improve nighttime routines

Healthy sleep habits and a consistent routine can help students get the amount of sleep needed. Some bedtime tips include:

  • Create a relaxing bedroom – Make the bedroom a dark, cool and peaceful place. Add window coverings dark enough to block out early morning or later evening light. If necessary, set up a fan or white noise machine to mask sounds from the rest of the household.
  • Avoid electronics – It’s important to avoid electronics before bedtime and especially while in bed – the bright light emitted by electronic devices can signal to the body that it should be awake and alert.
  • Develop a relaxing nightly routine – Consider adding reading, journaling or taking a warm bath or shower to your nightly routine. This will help students wind down from a long school day and prepare them for a good night’s sleep!

3. The impact of remote learning

Due to COVID-19, many schools and students are utilizing remote learning or a hybrid schedule. Four out of 10 parents say that remote learning due to COVID-19 affects their school-age children’s waketime and bedtime consistency. For students that don’t have to catch a bus or carpool at a certain time, it may be difficult to maintain a consistent sleep schedule. But keeping to regular bedtimes and waketimes during remote learning is essential so children get the healthy sleep they need to learn, function and grow.

Parents, students and educators – including teachers, school administrators, counselors, nurses, physical educators and more – can help to encourage healthy sleep habits for students to excel in the classroom, and out. We all play a key role in ensuring all students have the opportunity to get enough sleep and develop healthy sleep habits that will last a lifetime.

    Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

    You might also like...

    Community//

    15 Tips on How To Deal with Student Burnout

    by Aby League
    Community//

    10 Ways to Improve Your Child’s Sleep

    by Gina Dewink
    Community//

    Student Sleep Health Week: The ABC’s of Catching Healthy Z’s

    by Dr. Kannan Ramar

    Sign up for the Thrive Global newsletter

    Will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Thrive Global
    People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

    - MARCUS AURELIUS

    We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.