The Value of Local Volunteer Work

Giving to charity and others in need doesn’t always have to be a monetary act. While financial donations are still a great way to help others, looking at community leadership from a volunteer perspective, can be just as rewarding. Volunteer work is done in various ways. From working with individuals in your local community to […]

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Giving to charity and others in need doesn’t always have to be a monetary act. While financial donations are still a great way to help others, looking at community leadership from a volunteer perspective, can be just as rewarding. Volunteer work is done in various ways. From working with individuals in your local community to offering volunteer services abroad, your actions are positively impacting another person’s life. Becoming a local volunteer doesn’t just positively affect others, but it also adds value to your life:

Builds New Skills

The work you do as a local volunteer can help you develop and build new skills. Whether you’re focusing on the logistics of setting up a charity event or volunteering time to build a new community park, you’ll likely walk away with a new skill or two. You can even find volunteer work that enhances the skills you already possess. 

Provides a Purpose 

For many volunteer workers, the value comes from having a purpose. As we grow older, day to day tasks like work or caring for a home can become monotonous. By volunteering in your local community, you can develop the sense of purpose that comes from helping someone else. In fact, studies have shown that volunteer work significantly helps individuals with mental health disorders. According to The Balance, “When people with OCD, PTSD, or anger management issues volunteer, they feel more connected to others. They have an increased sense of purpose. Connection and meaning translate to decreased symptoms and improved social function.” While many volunteers are focusing on helping someone else, they may not realize that they’re also helping themselves.

Builds Relationships 

Volunteer work is a sure way to expand your connections and build long-lasting relationships with others. Social interaction, in general, is known to improve both mental and physical health. Consistent socialization can contribute to improved brain function and decrease levels of anxiety or depression. As a volunteer, you’re working with others to reach a common goal. Over time, you will begin to foster and build the foundations of new relationships. 

As a local volunteer, you’re not only working toward making a difference in your community but also working toward self-improvement. 

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For more information visit ericperardi.org

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