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The Unfiltered Truth of Mature Women

Most mature women, statistics claim, by age 45, a whopping 50% divorced and they are as financially secure as they will ever be. Having once been young and vibrant into the transition to a more mature and older adult usually limits the possibilities of further education and longevity working long hours states Dr. Resse Fillman, […]

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Most mature women, statistics claim, by age 45, a whopping 50% divorced and they are as financially secure as they will ever be. Having once been young and vibrant into the transition to a more mature and older adult usually limits the possibilities of further education and longevity working long hours states Dr. Resse Fillman, a behavior therapist at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. “There are days a pre-menopausal 45-year-old woman hardly feels herself at times, much less striving to be super-woman in the workforce industry. This stage of life is the stage when most mature women start to understand the value of how to unwind and be happy.”

In a recent study from Harvard University in 2019, a leading therapist made brass clad-claims that a woman isn’t really motivated and knows what she wants in life until she gets near middle age. With this being said, many women feel the polar opposite. In an interview with 10 women, training in ages from 45-51 years in age, a young thriving 24-year-old journalist from Hawaii got the group of volunteers in her neighborhood together for some acute questioning claimed that the majority, near 90% of these women, either pre-menopausal or in menopause didn’t have a great concern for material things and that their main focus in like was more centered around family, home, and peace of mind.

This particular group of women met three nights a week at a local church recreation luncheonette table so journalists and student nurses in psychology could questions them in-depth about how they unwind and relax. 23% of these women, again, ranging in age 45-51 said they read to unwind. 19% of these women said social media, especially Facebook is their outlet when they come in from a long day at work and a whopping 56% stated their refuge was either lying on the couch or going to be and watching TV. So much for the hot baths and candles as most portray the images of relaxing meaning in our heads.

An older group of women from ages 62-74 states the best thing to help them unwind was not so different at all. 4% in this group said cooking helped them unwind, 34% said that they enjoyed hobbies such as sewing or gardening and 50% said watching TV was their method to relax and unwind. No matter what is choose and how many people we interview, they all are relatively alike and relaxed in very similar ways.

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