The Transition from Team Member to Team Leader | Matthew Littlmore

Every team leader starts out as a team member who was one person in a crowd of many people. Making the transition is difficult when trying to gain the trust of peers and learn the trade. And some rules are not written in the company’s policy handbook. When making the smooth transition to become a team […]

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Every team leader starts out as a team member who was one person in a crowd of many people. Making the transition is difficult when trying to gain the trust of peers and learn the trade. And some rules are not written in the company’s policy handbook. When making the smooth transition to become a team leader, there are several important facts to remember.

Observe Current Leaders

The best way to learn is by experience. This involves studying the current leaders and knowing what they’re doing in their roles. Future team leaders should take notes of what the current leaders are doing wrong, what they’re doing correctly, and how they can make improvements.

Reintroduce Self in the New Role

Former team members should reintroduce themselves in their new leadership roles. They should expect their former team members to acknowledge them as leaders and approach them in a more professional and less casual manner. A good place to start is at the next team meeting.

Know the New Team

New team leaders should become familiar with their new staff and surroundings. It’s important to know the different personalities that shape the company and understand the clever minds that make the best decisions. During this time, new leaders should share their contact details with others and communicate often through email, texts, phone calls, etc. A team leader has to work in a team with other leaders where everyone shares ideas, sets goals and assigns tasks. Team leaders are thought of as being equal and must think collectively to achieve the same tasks.

Practice Problem-Solving Scenarios

Being able to solve difficult problems is an essential part of leadership. The staff expects leaders to know exactly what to do in challenging situations, whether the building shuts down or a customer is complaining. Leaders should reenact scenarios where difficult problems occur and choose the best response. These scenarios are common in work training sessions that are available online to job seekers.

The natural progression of any entry-level worker is to obtain a managerial position. There are certain steps that work the best when you finally decide to lead a team. It’s necessary to create a plan to become a leader and carry it out step by step.

This blog was originally published on MatthewLittlmore.net

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